Agencies | Governor
Virginia Regulatory Town Hall
Agency
Department of Professional and Occupational Regulation
Board
Board for Barbers and Cosmetology
chapter
Board for Barbers and Cosmetology Tattooing Regulations [18 VAC 41 ‑ 50]
Action General Review 2017 | Tattoo and Body-Piercing
Stage Proposed
Comment Period Ends 9/20/2019
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8/13/19  1:07 am
Commenter: gabriel cece, studio evolve tattoo

public town hall meeting 8.12.19
 
 
On Monday, Abby and I were in attendance at the public town hall meeting at the DPOR building in RVA. Even though Abby and I went back to the meeting after it happened, and spent some time talking with Steven about several topics, i thought that it was important to share one of the most important things i watched and learned from.
 
The gentleman representing his tattoo school is in fact, the reason that tattoo schools need more regulation and oversight. Not to be insulting to the man, and how he makes his living (pushing students through his business in as few hours as possible), but, he is clearly in the dark about practical requirements and training in application, versus academic information being dispersed into a classroom.
 
Tattooing, in its very essence, requires hours of information exchanged verbally (as well as through the written word and through apprentice/student independent research), but also many many more hours of practical hands on training and experience, before being qualified enough to even touch a tattoo machine, much less tattoo, or take the test to become a legitimately licensed tattooer.
 
The gentleman, was present to gather information and question some of the newly proposed regulations, as he didn't seem to have spent much time reading thoroughly enough to understand them. He was also there to oppose the increase of student hours from 750 to 1000 hours, saying that it was difficult for his students to even achieve the standard now. He went on to use tattoo apprenticeships and their (sometimes potential) cost as an example of our bad business, and also referred to myself and Abby, and to what we said, regarding our ideas of what we think standards should be.
 
All of which to me, and his presence there alone, further exemplifies that tattoo schools breed ignorance and improper training standards. The gentleman clearly has no knowledge of tattooing and it's basic core principals, is likely not a licensed tattooer, mentor, instructor, or legal tattoo school, and his goal there was to see the required hours stay the same as they are, or even lessened, nothing more.
 
I stand by my original point, even more so now, that tattoo schools need more regulation and stricter guidelines, equal and fair requirements and hours to match ours as tattooers, and public transparent viewing of their curriculum.
 
The one thing that the gentleman brought up, that actually made sense, is that hours for permanent cosmetic training should be raised. I wholeheartedly concur, and couldn't agree more. Tattooing apprenticeships, permanent cosmetic tattoo apprenticeships, permanent cosmetic schools, and tattoo schools should all be held to the same rules, regulations, expectations, and hours required, having one mentor or teacher, to two apprentices or students at the same time...1500 hours, across the board, no exceptions, fair and balanced. We all inevitably break the skin with a needle, that goes through a tube, attached to a machine, that leaves pigment behind...henceforth, tattooing.
 
In closing, i ask you all to please consider logic and reason, the difference between right and wrong, fairness to everyone involved, and that the public safety that could actually be compromised when students are being taught at substandard levels, by incompetent instructors and school leaders. 
 
Lastly, again, i am asking that all tattooers and tattoo studios in the commonwealth of Virginia, be directly notified when new legislation is being pushed through the DPOR. It's only fair to everyone, who's livelihood is on the table, with every bit of regulation that passes.
 
thank you for reading,
Gabriel Cece