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9VAC5-10-20

9VAC5-10-20. Terms defined.

"Actual emissions rate" means the actual rate of emissions of a pollutant from an emissions unit. In general actual emissions shall equal the average rate, in tons per year, at which the unit actually emitted the pollutant during the most recent two-year period or some other two-year period which is representative of normal source operation. If the board determines that no two-year period is representative of normal source operation, the board shall allow the use of an alternative period of time upon a determination by the board that it is more representative of normal source operation. Actual emissions shall be calculated using the unit's actual operating hours, production rates, and types of materials processed, stored, or combusted during the selected time period.

"Administrator" means the administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) or his authorized representative.

"Affected facility" means, with reference to a stationary source, any part, equipment, facility, installation, apparatus, process or operation to which an emission standard is applicable or any other facility so designated. The term "affected facility" includes any affected source as defined in 40 CFR 63.2.

"Air pollution" means the presence in the outdoor atmosphere of one or more substances which are or may be harmful or injurious to human health, welfare or safety; to animal or plant life; or to property; or which unreasonably interfere with the enjoyment by the people of life or property.

"Air quality" means the specific measurement in the ambient air of a particular air pollutant at any given time.

"Air quality control region" means any area designated as such in 9VAC5-20-200.

"Alternative method" means any method of sampling and analyzing for an air pollutant which is not a reference or equivalent method, but which has been demonstrated to the satisfaction of the board, in specific cases, to produce results adequate for its determination of compliance.

"Ambient air" means that portion of the atmosphere, external to buildings, to which the general public has access.

"Ambient air quality standard" means any primary or secondary standard designated as such in 9VAC5-30 (Ambient Air Quality Standards).

"Board" means the State Air Pollution Control Board or its designated representative.

"Class I area" means any prevention of significant deterioration area (i) in which virtually any deterioration of existing air quality is considered significant and (ii) designated as such in 9VAC5-20-205.

"Class II area" means any prevention of significant deterioration area (i) in which any deterioration of existing air quality beyond that normally accompanying well-controlled growth is considered significant and (ii) designated as such in 9VAC5-20-205.

"Class III area" means any prevention of significant deterioration area (i) in which deterioration of existing air quality to the levels of the ambient air quality standards is permitted and (ii) designated as such in 9VAC5-20-205.

"Continuous monitoring system" means the total equipment used to sample and condition (if applicable), to analyze, and to provide a permanent continuous record of emissions or process parameters.

"Control program" means a plan formulated by the owner of a stationary source to establish pollution abatement goals, including a compliance schedule to achieve such goals. The plan may be submitted voluntarily, or upon request or by order of the board, to ensure compliance by the owner with standards, policies and regulations adopted by the board. The plan shall include system and equipment information and operating performance projections as required by the board for evaluating the probability of achievement. A control program shall contain the following increments of progress:

1. The date by which contracts for emission control system or process modifications are to be awarded, or the date by which orders are to be issued for the purchase of component parts to accomplish emission control or process modification.

2. The date by which the on-site construction or installation of emission control equipment or process change is to be initiated.

3. The date by which the on-site construction or installation of emission control equipment or process modification is to be completed.

4. The date by which final compliance is to be achieved.

"Criteria pollutant" means any pollutant for which an ambient air quality standard is established under 9VAC5-30 (Ambient Air Quality Standards).

"Day" means a 24-hour period beginning at midnight.

"Delayed compliance order" means any order of the board issued after an appropriate hearing to an owner which postpones the date by which a stationary source is required to comply with any requirement contained in the applicable implementation plan.

"Department" means any employee or other representative of the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, as designated by the director.

"Director" or "executive director" means the director of the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality or a designated representative.

"Dispersion technique"

1. Means any technique which attempts to affect the concentration of a pollutant in the ambient air by:

a. Using that portion of a stack which exceeds good engineering practice stack height;

b. Varying the rate of emission of a pollutant according to atmospheric conditions or ambient concentrations of that pollutant; or

c. Increasing final exhaust gas plume rise by manipulating source process parameters, exhaust gas parameters, stack parameters, or combining exhaust gases from several existing stacks into one stack; or other selective handling of exhaust gas streams so as to increase the exhaust gas plume rise.

2. The preceding sentence does not include:

a. The reheating of a gas stream, following use of a pollution control system, for the purpose of returning the gas to the temperature at which it was originally discharged from the facility generating the gas stream;

b. The merging of exhaust gas streams where:

(1) The owner demonstrates that the facility was originally designed and constructed with such merged gas streams;

(2) After July 8, 1985, such merging is part of a change in operation at the facility that includes the installation of pollution controls and is accompanied by a net reduction in the allowable emissions of a pollutant. This exclusion from the definition of "dispersion techniques" shall apply only to the emissions limitation for the pollutant affected by such change in operation; or

(3) Before July 8, 1985, such merging was part of a change in operation at the facility that included the installation of emissions control equipment or was carried out for sound economic or engineering reasons. Where there was an increase in the emissions limitation or, in the event that no emissions limitation was in existence prior to the merging, an increase in the quantity of pollutants actually emitted prior to the merging, the board shall presume that merging was significantly motivated by an intent to gain emissions credit for greater dispersion. Absent a demonstration by the owner that merging was not significantly motivated by such intent, the board shall deny credit for the effects of such merging in calculating the allowable emissions for the source;

c. Smoke management in agricultural or silvicultural prescribed burning programs;

d. Episodic restrictions on residential woodburning and open burning; or

e. Techniques under subdivision 1 c of this definition which increase final exhaust gas plume rise where the resulting allowable emissions of sulfur dioxide from the facility do not exceed 5,000 tons per year.

"Emergency" means a situation that immediately and unreasonably affects, or has the potential to immediately and unreasonably affect, public health, safety or welfare; the health of animal or plant life; or property, whether used for recreational, commercial, industrial, agricultural or other reasonable use.

"Emissions limitation" means any requirement established by the board which limits the quantity, rate, or concentration of continuous emissions of air pollutants, including any requirements which limit the level of opacity, prescribe equipment, set fuel specifications, or prescribe operation or maintenance procedures to assure continuous emission reduction.

"Emission standard" means any provision of 9VAC5-40 (Existing Stationary Sources), 9VAC5-50 (New and Modified Stationary Sources), or 9VAC5-60 (Hazardous Air Pollutant Sources) that prescribes an emissions limitation, or other requirements that control air pollution emissions.

"Emissions unit" means any part of a stationary source which emits or would have the potential to emit any air pollutant.

"Equivalent method" means any method of sampling and analyzing for an air pollutant which has been demonstrated to the satisfaction of the board to have a consistent and quantitative relationship to the reference method under specified conditions.

"EPA" means the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or an authorized representative.

"Excess emissions" means emissions of air pollutant in excess of an emission standard.

"Excessive concentration" is defined for the purpose of determining good engineering practice (GEP) stack height under subdivision 3 of the GEP definition and means:

1. For sources seeking credit for stack height exceeding that established under subdivision 2 of the GEP definition, a maximum ground-level concentration due to emissions from a stack due in whole or part to downwash, wakes, and eddy effects produced by nearby structures or nearby terrain features which individually is at least 40% in excess of the maximum concentration experienced in the absence of such downwash, wakes, or eddy effects and which contributes to a total concentration due to emissions from all sources that is greater than an ambient air quality standard. For sources subject to the provisions of Article 8 (9VAC5-80-1605 et seq.) of Part II of 9VAC5-80 (Permits for Stationary Sources), an excessive concentration alternatively means a maximum ground-level concentration due to emissions from a stack due in whole or part to downwash, wakes, or eddy effects produced by nearby structures or nearby terrain features which individually is at least 40% in excess of the maximum concentration experienced in the absence of the maximum concentration experienced in the absence of such downwash, wakes, or eddy effects and greater than a prevention of significant deterioration increment. The allowable emission rate to be used in making demonstrations under this provision shall be prescribed by the new source performance standard that is applicable to the source category unless the owner demonstrates that this emission rate is infeasible. Where such demonstrations are approved by the board, an alternative emission rate shall be established in consultation with the owner;

2. For sources seeking credit after October 11, 1983, for increases in existing stack heights up to the heights established under subdivision 2 of the GEP definition, either (i) a maximum ground-level concentration due in whole or part to downwash, wakes or eddy effects as provided in subdivision 1 of this definition, except that the emission rate specified by any applicable implementation plan (or, in the absence of such a limit, the actual emission rate) shall be used, or (ii) the actual presence of a local nuisance caused by the existing stack, as determined by the board; and

3. For sources seeking credit after January 12, 1979, for a stack height determined under subdivision 2 of the GEP definition where the board requires the use of a field study or fluid model to verify GEP stack height, for sources seeking stack height credit after November 9, 1984, based on the aerodynamic influence of cooling towers, and for sources seeking stack height credit after December 31, 1970, based on the aerodynamic influence of structures not adequately represented by the equations in subdivision 2 of the GEP definition, a maximum ground-level concentration due in whole or part to downwash, wakes or eddy effects that is at least 40% in excess of the maximum concentration experienced in the absence of such downwash, wakes, or eddy effects.

"Existing source" means any stationary source other than a new source or modified source.

"Facility" means something that is built, installed or established to serve a particular purpose; includes, but is not limited to, buildings, installations, public works, businesses, commercial and industrial plants, shops and stores, heating and power plants, apparatus, processes, operations, structures, and equipment of all types.

"Federal Clean Air Act" means Chapter 85 (§ 7401 et seq.) of Title 42 of the United States Code.

"Federally enforceable" means all limitations and conditions which are enforceable by the administrator and citizens under the federal Clean Air Act or that are enforceable under other statutes administered by the administrator. Federally enforceable limitations and conditions include, but are not limited to, the following:

1. Emission standards, alternative emission standards, alternative emissions limitations, and equivalent emissions limitations established pursuant to § 112 of the federal Clean Air Act as amended in 1990.

2. New source performance standards established pursuant to § 111 of the federal Clean Air Act, and emission standards established pursuant to § 112 of the federal Clean Air Act before it was amended in 1990.

3. All terms and conditions in a federal operating permit, including any provisions that limit a source's potential to emit, unless expressly designated as not federally enforceable.

4. Limitations and conditions that are part of an implementation plan.

5. Limitations and conditions that are part of a section 111(d) or section 111(d)/129 plan.

6. Limitations and conditions that are part of a federal construction permit issued under 40 CFR 52.21 or any construction permit issued under regulations approved by EPA in accordance with 40 CFR Part 51.

7. Limitations and conditions that are part of an operating permit issued pursuant to a program approved by EPA into an implementation plan as meeting EPA's minimum criteria for federal enforceability, including adequate notice and opportunity for EPA and public comment prior to issuance of the final permit and practicable enforceability.

8. Limitations and conditions in a Virginia regulation or program that has been approved by EPA under subpart E of 40 CFR Part 63 for the purposes of implementing and enforcing § 112 of the federal Clean Air Act.

9. Individual consent agreements issued pursuant to the legal authority of EPA.

"Good engineering practice" or "GEP," with reference to the height of the stack, means the greater of:

1. 65 meters, measured from the ground-level elevation at the base of the stack;

2. a. For stacks in existence on January 12, 1979, and for which the owner had obtained all applicable permits or approvals required under 9VAC5-80 (Permits for Stationary Sources),

Hg = 2.5H,

provided the owner produces evidence that this equation was actually relied on in establishing an emissions limitation;

b. For all other stacks,

Hg = H + 1.5L,

where:

Hg = good engineering practice stack height, measured from the ground-level elevation at the base of the stack,

H = height of nearby structure(s) measured from the ground-level elevation at the base of the stack,

L = lesser dimension, height or projected width, of nearby structure(s) provided that the board may require the use of a field study or fluid model to verify GEP stack height for the source; or

3. The height demonstrated by a fluid model or a field study approved by the board, which ensures that the emissions from a stack do not result in excessive concentrations of any air pollutant as a result of atmospheric downwash, wakes, or eddy effects created by the source itself, nearby structures or nearby terrain features.

"Hazardous air pollutant" means an air pollutant to which no ambient air quality standard is applicable and which in the judgment of the administrator causes, or contributes to, air pollution which may reasonably be anticipated to result in an increase in mortality or an increase in serious irreversible, or incapacitating reversible, illness.

"Implementation plan" means the portion or portions of the state implementation plan, or the most recent revision thereof, which has been approved under § 110 of the federal Clean Air Act, or promulgated under § 110(c) of the federal Clean Air Act, or promulgated or approved pursuant to regulations promulgated under § 301(d) of the federal Clean Air Act and which implements the relevant requirements of the federal Clean Air Act.

"Initial emission test" means the test required by any regulation, permit issued pursuant to 9VAC5-80 (Permits for Stationary Sources), control program, compliance schedule or other enforceable mechanism for determining compliance with new or more stringent emission standards or permit limitations or other emissions limitations requiring the installation or modification of air pollution control equipment or implementation of a control method. Initial emission tests shall be conducted in accordance with 9VAC5-40-30.

"Initial performance test" means the test required by (i) 40 CFR Part 60 for determining compliance with standards of performance, or (ii) a permit issued pursuant to 9VAC5-80 (Permits for Stationary Sources) for determining initial compliance with permit limitations. Initial performance tests shall be conducted in accordance with 9VAC5-50-30 and 9VAC5-60-30.

"Isokinetic sampling" means sampling in which the linear velocity of the gas entering the sampling nozzle is equal to that of the undisturbed gas stream at the sample point.

"Locality" means a city, town, county or other public body created by or pursuant to state law.

"Maintenance area" means any geographic region of the United States previously designated as a nonattainment area and subsequently redesignated to attainment subject to the requirement to develop a maintenance plan and designated as such in 9VAC5-20-203.

"Malfunction" means any sudden failure of air pollution control equipment, of process equipment, or of a process to operate in a normal or usual manner, which failure is not due to intentional misconduct or negligent conduct on the part of the owner or other person. Failures that are caused in part by poor maintenance or careless operation are not malfunctions.

"Metropolitan statistical area" means any area designated as such in 9VAC5-20-202.

"Monitoring device" means the total equipment used to measure and record (if applicable) process parameters.

"Nearby" as used in the definition of good engineering practice (GEP) is defined for a specific structure or terrain feature and:

1. For purposes of applying the formulae provided in subdivision 2 of the GEP definition means that distance up to five times the lesser of the height or the width dimension of a structure, but not greater than 0.8 km (1/2 mile); and

2. For conducting demonstrations under subdivision 3 of the GEP definition means not greater than 0.8 km (1/2 mile), except that the portion of a terrain feature may be considered to be nearby which falls within a distance of up to 10 times the maximum height (Ht) of the feature, not to exceed two miles if such feature achieves a height (Ht) 0.8 km from the stack that is at least 40% of the GEP stack height determined by the formulae provided in subdivision 2 b of the GEP definition or 26 meters, whichever is greater, as measured from the ground-level elevation at the base of the stack. The height of the structure or terrain feature is measured from the ground-level elevation at the base of the stack.

"Nitrogen oxides" means all oxides of nitrogen except nitrous oxide, as measured by test methods set forth in 40 CFR Part 60.

"Nonattainment area" means any area which is shown by air quality monitoring data or, where such data are not available, which is calculated by air quality modeling (or other methods determined by the board to be reliable) to exceed the levels allowed by the ambient air quality standard for a given pollutant including, but not limited to, areas designated as such in 9VAC5-20-204.

"One hour" means any period of 60 consecutive minutes.

"One-hour period" means any period of 60 consecutive minutes commencing on the hour.

"Organic compound" means any chemical compound of carbon excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic disulfide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides, metallic carbonates and ammonium carbonate.

"Owner" means any person, including bodies politic and corporate, associations, partnerships, personal representatives, trustees and committees, as well as individuals, who owns, leases, operates, controls or supervises a source.

"Particulate matter" means any airborne finely divided solid or liquid material with an aerodynamic diameter smaller than 100 micrometers.

"Particulate matter emissions" means all finely divided solid or liquid material, other than uncombined water, emitted to the ambient air as measured by the applicable reference method, or an equivalent or alternative method.

"PM10" means particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to a nominal 10 micrometers as measured by the applicable reference method or an equivalent method.

"PM10 emissions" means finely divided solid or liquid material, with an aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to a nominal 10 micrometers emitted to the ambient air as measured by the applicable reference method, or an equivalent or alternative method.

"Performance test" means a test for determining emissions from new or modified sources.

"Person" means an individual, corporation, partnership, association, a governmental body, a municipal corporation, or any other legal entity.

"Pollutant" means any substance the presence of which in the outdoor atmosphere is or may be harmful or injurious to human health, welfare or safety, to animal or plant life, or to property, or which unreasonably interferes with the enjoyment by the people of life or property.

"Potential to emit" means the maximum capacity of a stationary source to emit a pollutant under its physical and operational design. Any physical or operational limitation on the capacity of the source to emit a pollutant, including air pollution control equipment, and restrictions on hours of operation or on the type or amount of material combusted, stored, or processed, shall be treated as part of its design only if the limitation or its effect on emissions is state and federally enforceable.

"Prevention of significant deterioration area" means any area not designated as a nonattainment area in 9VAC5-20-204 for a particular pollutant and designated as such in 9VAC5-20-205.

"Proportional sampling" means sampling at a rate that produces a constant ratio of sampling rate to stack gas flow rate.

"Public hearing" means, unless indicated otherwise, an informal proceeding, similar to that provided for in § 2.2-4007.02 of the Administrative Process Act, held to afford persons an opportunity to submit views and data relative to a matter on which a decision of the board is pending.

"Reference method" means any method of sampling and analyzing for an air pollutant as described in the following EPA regulations:

1. For ambient air quality standards in 9VAC5-30 (Ambient Air Quality Standards): The applicable appendix of 40 CFR Part 50 or any method that has been designated as a reference method in accordance with 40 CFR Part 53, except that it does not include a method for which a reference designation has been canceled in accordance with 40 CFR 53.11 or 40 CFR 53.16.

2. For emission standards in 9VAC5-40 (Existing Stationary Sources) and 9VAC5-50 (New and Modified Stationary Sources): Appendix M of 40 CFR Part 51 or Appendix A of 40 CFR Part 60.

3. For emission standards in 9VAC5-60 (Hazardous Air Pollutant Sources): Appendix B of 40 CFR Part 61 or Appendix A of 40 CFR Part 63.

"Regional director" means the regional director of an administrative region of the Department of Environmental Quality or a designated representative.

"Regulation of the board" means any regulation adopted by the State Air Pollution Control Board under any provision of the Code of Virginia.

"Regulations for the Control and Abatement of Air Pollution" means 9VAC5-10 (General Definitions) through 9VAC5-80 (Permits for Stationary Sources).

"Reid vapor pressure" means the absolute vapor pressure of volatile crude oil and volatile nonviscous petroleum liquids except liquefied petroleum gases as determined by American Society for Testing and Materials publication, "Standard Test Method for Vapor Pressure of Petroleum Products (Reid Method)" (see 9VAC5-20-21).

"Run" means the net period of time during which an emission sample is collected. Unless otherwise specified, a run may be either intermittent or continuous within the limits of good engineering practice.

"Section 111(d) plan" means the portion or portions of the plan, or the most recent revision thereof, which has been approved under 40 CFR 60.27(b) in accordance with § 111(d)(1) of the federal Clean Air Act, or promulgated under 40 CFR 60.27(d) in accordance with § 111 (d)(2) of the federal Clean Air Act, and which implements the relevant requirements of the federal Clean Air Act.

"Section 111(d)/129 plan" means the portion or portions of the plan, or the most recent revision thereof, which has been approved under 40 CFR 60.27(b) in accordance with §§ 111(d)(1) and 129(b)(2) of the federal Clean Air Act, or promulgated under 40 CFR 60.27(d) in accordance with §§ 111(d)(2) and 129(b)(3) of the federal Clean Air Act, and which implements the relevant requirements of the federal Clean Air Act.

"Shutdown" means the cessation of operation of an affected facility for any purpose.

"Source" means any one or combination of the following: buildings, structures, facilities, installations, articles, machines, equipment, landcraft, watercraft, aircraft or other contrivances which contribute, or may contribute, either directly or indirectly to air pollution. Any activity by any person that contributes, or may contribute, either directly or indirectly to air pollution, including, but not limited to, open burning, generation of fugitive dust or emissions, and cleaning with abrasives or chemicals.

"Stack" means any point in a source designed to emit solids, liquids or gases into the air, including a pipe or duct, but not including flares.

"Stack in existence" means that the owner had:

1. Begun, or caused to begin, a continuous program of physical on site construction of the stack; or

2. Entered into binding agreements or contractual obligations, which could not be canceled or modified without substantial loss to the owner, to undertake a program of construction of the stack to be completed in a reasonable time.

"Standard conditions" means a temperature of 20°C (68°F) and a pressure of 760 mm of Hg (29.92 inches of Hg).

"Standard of performance" means any provision of 9VAC5-50 (New and Modified Stationary Sources) which prescribes an emissions limitation or other requirements that control air pollution emissions.

"Startup" means the setting in operation of an affected facility for any purpose.

"State enforceable" means all limitations and conditions which are enforceable by the board or department, including, but not limited to, those requirements developed pursuant to 9VAC5-20-110; requirements within any applicable regulation, order, consent agreement or variance; and any permit requirements established pursuant to 9VAC5-80 (Permits for Stationary Sources).

"State Implementation Plan" means the plan, including the most recent revision thereof, which has been approved or promulgated by the administrator, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, under § 110 of the federal Clean Air Act, and which implements the requirements of § 110.

"Stationary source" means any building, structure, facility or installation which emits or may emit any air pollutant. A stationary source shall include all of the pollutant-emitting activities which belong to the same industrial grouping, are located on one or more contiguous or adjacent properties, and are under the control of the same person (or persons under common control) except the activities of any vessel. Pollutant-emitting activities shall be considered as part of the same industrial grouping if they belong to the same "Major Group" (i.e., which have the same two-digit code) as described in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (see 9VAC5-20-21).

"These regulations" means 9VAC5-10 (General Definitions) through 9VAC5-80 (Permits for Stationary Sources).

"Total suspended particulate (TSP)" means particulate matter as measured by the reference method described in Appendix B of 40 CFR Part 50.

"True vapor pressure" means the equilibrium partial pressure exerted by a petroleum liquid as determined in accordance with methods described in American Petroleum Institute (API) publication, "Evaporative Loss from External Floating-Roof Tanks" (see 9VAC5-20-21). The API procedure may not be applicable to some high viscosity or high pour crudes. Available estimates of true vapor pressure may be used in special cases such as these.

"Urban area" means any area consisting of a core city with a population of 50,000 or more plus any surrounding localities with a population density of 80 persons per square mile and designated as such in 9VAC5-20-201.

"Vapor pressure," except where specific test methods are specified, means true vapor pressure, whether measured directly, or determined from Reid vapor pressure by use of the applicable nomograph in American Petroleum Institute publication, "Evaporative Loss from Floating-Roof Tanks" (see 9VAC5-20-21).

"Virginia Air Pollution Control Law" means Chapter 13 (§ 10.1-1300 et seq.) of Title 10.1 of the Code of Virginia.

"Volatile organic compound" means any compound of carbon, excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides or carbonates, and ammonium carbonate, which participates in atmospheric photochemical reactions.

1. This includes any such organic compounds which have been determined to have negligible photochemical reactivity other than the following:

a. Methane;

b. Ethane;

c. Methylene chloride (dichloromethane);

d. 1,1,1-trichloroethane (methyl chloroform);

e. 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane (CFC-113);

f. Trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11);

g. Dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12);

h. Chlorodifluoromethane (H CFC-22);

i. Trifluoromethane (H FC-23);

j. 1,2-dichloro 1,1,2,2,-tetrafluoroethane (CFC-114);

k. Chloropentafluoroethane (CFC-115);

l. 1,1,1-trifluoro 2,2-dichloroethane (HCFC-123);

m. 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a);

n. 1,1-dichloro 1-fluoroethane (HCFC-141b);

o. 1-chloro 1,1-difluoroethane (HCFC-142b);

p. 2-chloro-1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HCFC-124);

q. Pentafluoroethane (HFC-125);

r. 1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134);

s. 1,1,1-trifluoroethane (HFC-143a);

t. 1,1-difluoroethane (HFC-152a);

u. Parachlorobenzotrifluoride (PCBTF);

v. Cyclic, branched, or linear completely methylated siloxanes;

w. Acetone;

x. Perchloroethylene (tetrachloroethylene);

y. 3,3-dichloro-1,1,1,2,2-pentafluoropropane (HCFC-225ca);

z. 1,3-dichloro-1,1,2,2,3-pentafluoropropane (HCFC-225cb);

aa. 1,1,1,2,3,4,4,5,5,5-decafluoropentane (HFC 43-10mee);

bb. Difluoromethane (HFC-32);

cc. Ethylfluoride (HFC-161);

dd. 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoropropane (HFC-236fa);

ee. 1,1,2,2,3-pentafluoropropane (HFC-245ca);

ff. 1,1,2,3,3-pentafluoropropane (HFC-245ea);

gg. 1,1,1,2,3-pentafluoropropane (HFC-245eb);

hh. 1,1,1,3,3-pentafluoropropane (HFC-245fa);

ii. 1,1,1,2,3,3-hexafluoropropane (HFC-236ea);

jj. 1,1,1,3,3-pentafluorobutane (HFC-365mfc);

kk. Chlorofluoromethane (HCFC-31);

ll. 1 chloro-1-fluoroethane (HCFC-151a);

mm. 1,2-dichloro-1,1,2-trifluoroethane (HCFC-123a);

nn. 1,1,1,2,2,3,3,4,4-nonafluoro-4-methoxy-butane (C4F9OCH3 or HFE-7100);

oo. 2-(difluoromethoxymethyl)-1,1,1,2,3,3,3-hepta-fluoropropane ((CF3)2CFCF2 OCH3);

pp. 1-ethoxy-1,1,2,2,3,3,4,4,4-nonafluorobutane (C4F9 OC2H5 or HFE-7200);

qq. 2-(ethoxydifluoromethyl)-1,1,1,2,3,3,3-hepta-fluoropropane ((CF3)2CFCF2OC2H5);

rr. Methyl acetate; ss. 1,1,1,2,2,3,3-heptafluoro-3-methoxy-propane (n-C3F7OCH3) (HFE-7000);

tt. 3-ethoxy-1,1,1,2,3,4,4,5,5,6,6,6-dodecafluoro-2-(trifluoromethyl) hexane (HFE-7500);

uu. 1,1,1,2,3,3,3-heptafluoropropane (HFC 227ea);

vv. methyl formate (HCOOCH3);

ww. (1) 1,1,1,2,2,3,4,5,5,5-decafluoro-3-methoxy-4-trifluoromethyl-pentane (HFE-7300);

xx. propylene carbonate;

yy. dimethyl carbonate; and

zz. Perfluorocarbon compounds which fall into these classes:

(1) Cyclic, branched, or linear, completely fluorinated alkanes;

(2) Cyclic, branched, or linear, completely fluorinated ethers with no unsaturations;

(3) Cyclic, branched, or linear, completely fluorinated tertiary amines with no unsaturations; and

(4) Sulfur containing perfluorocarbons with no unsaturations and with sulfur bonds only to carbon and fluorine.

2. For purposes of determining compliance with emissions standards, volatile organic compounds shall be measured by the appropriate reference method in accordance with the provisions of 9VAC5-40-30 or 9VAC5-50-30, as applicable. Where such a method also measures compounds with negligible photochemical reactivity, these negligibly reactive compounds may be excluded as a volatile organic compound if the amount of such compounds is accurately quantified, and such exclusion is approved by the board.

3. As a precondition to excluding these compounds as volatile organic compounds or at any time thereafter, the board may require an owner to provide monitoring or testing methods and results demonstrating, to the satisfaction of the board, the amount of negligibly reactive compounds in the emissions of the source.

4. Exclusion of the above compounds in this definition in effect exempts such compounds from the provisions of emission standards for volatile organic compounds. The compounds are exempted on the basis of being so inactive that they will not contribute significantly to the formation of ozone in the troposphere. However, this exemption does not extend to other properties of the exempted compounds which, at some future date, may require regulation and limitation of their use in accordance with requirements of the federal Clean Air Act.

5. The following compound is a VOC for purposes of all recordkeeping, emissions reporting, photochemical dispersion modeling and inventory requirements that apply to VOCs and shall be uniquely identified in emission reports, but is not a VOC for purposes of VOC emission standards, VOC emissions limitations, or VOC content requirements: t-butyl acetate.

"Welfare" means that language referring to effects on welfare includes, but is not limited to, effects on soils, water, crops, vegetation, man-made materials, animals, wildlife, weather, visibility and climate, damage to and deterioration of property, and hazards to transportation, as well as effects on economic values and on personal comfort and well-being.

9VAC5-20-202

9VAC5-20-202. Metropolitan statistical areas. (Repealed.)

Metropolitan Statistical Areas are geographically defined as follows:

TITLE

GEOGRAPHICAL AREA

Bristol MSA

Bristol City
Scott County
Washington County

Charlottesville MSA

Charlottesville City
Albemarle County
Fluvanna County
Greene County

Danville MSA

Danville City
Pittsylvania County

Lynchburg MSA

Bedford City
Lynchburg City
Amherst County
Bedford County
Campbell County

Norfolk-Virginia Beach-Newport News MSA

Chesapeake City
Norfolk City
Portsmouth City
Suffolk City
Virginia Beach City
Hampton City
Newport News City
Poquoson City
Williamsburg City
Gloucester County
Isle of Wight County
James City County
Mathews County
York County

Richmond-Petersburg MSA

Richmond City
Colonial Heights City
Hopewell City
Petersburg City
Charles City County
Chesterfield County
Goochland County
Hanover County
Henrico County
New Kent County
Powhatan County
Prince George County
Dinwiddie County

Roanoke MSA

Roanoke City
Salem City
Botetourt County
Roanoke County

National Capital MSA

Alexandria City
Fairfax City
Falls Church City
Fredericksburg City
Manassas City
Manassas Park City
Arlington County
Clarke County
Culpeper County
Fairfax County
Fauquier County
King George County
Loudoun County
Prince William County
Spottsylvania County
Stafford County
Warren County

9VAC5-40-6000

Article 44
Emission Standards for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators (Rule 4-44)

9VAC5-40-6000. Applicability and designation of affected facility. (Repealed.)

A. Except as provided in subsections C and D of this section, the affected facility to which the provisions of this article apply is each individual HMIWI for which construction was commenced on or before June 20, 1996.

B. The provisions of this article apply throughout the Commonwealth of Virginia.

C. Exempted from the provisions of this article are the following:

1. Combustors during periods when only pathological waste, low-level radioactive waste, or chemotherapeutic waste is burned, provided the owner:

a. Notifies the board of an exemption claim; and

b. Keeps records on a calendar quarter basis of the periods of time when only pathological waste, low-level radioactive waste, or chemotherapeutic waste is burned.

2. Any co-fired combustor if the owner of the co-fired combustor:

a. Notifies the board of an exemption claim;

b. Provides an estimate of the relative weight of hospital waste, medical/infectious waste, and other fuels and or wastes to be combusted; and

c. Keeps records on a calendar quarter basis of the weight of hospital waste and medical/infectious waste combusted, and the weight of all other fuels and wastes combusted at the co-fired combustor.

3. Any combustor required to have a permit under § 3005 of the Solid Waste Disposal Act (42 USC § 6901 et seq.).

4. Any combustor which meets the applicability requirements under subpart Ea or Eb of 40 CFR Part 60 (standards for certain municipal waste combustors).

5. Any pyrolysis unit.

6. Cement kilns firing hospital waste and medical/infectious waste or both.

D. The provisions of this article do not apply to affected facilities subject to the standards in 9VAC5 Chapter 40, Article 54 (9VAC5-40-7950 et seq.).

E. Physical or operational changes made to an existing HMIWI unit solely for the purpose of complying with this article are not considered a modification and do not result in an existing HMIWI unit becoming subject to the provisions of subpart Ec of 40 CFR Part 60 (see 40 CFR 60.50c).

F. Beginning September 15, 2000, affected facilities subject to this article shall operate pursuant to a federal operating permit.

G. The provisions of 40 CFR Part 60 cited in this article are applicable only to the extent that they are incorporated by reference in Article 5 (9VAC5-50-400 et seq.) of Part II of 9VAC5 Chapter 50.

H. The requirement of subdivision C 3 of this section with regard to obtaining a permit under § 3005 of the Solid Waste Disposal Act (42 USC § 6901 et seq.) may be met by obtaining a permit from the department as required by 9VAC20 Chapter 60.

9VAC5-40-6010

9VAC5-40-6010. Definitions. (Repealed.)

A. For the purpose of applying this article in the context of the Regulations for the Control and Abatement of Air Pollution and related uses, the words or terms shall have the meanings given them in subsection C of this section.

B. As used in this article, all terms not defined here shall have the meanings given them in 9VAC5 Chapter 10, unless otherwise required by context.

C. Terms defined.

"Batch HMIWI" means an HMIWI that is designed such that neither waste charging nor ash removal can occur during combustion.

"Biologicals" means preparations made from living organisms and their products, including vaccines, cultures, etc., intended for use in diagnosing, immunizing, or treating humans or animals or in research pertaining thereto.

"Blood products" means any product derived from human blood, including but not limited to blood plasma, platelets, red or white blood corpuscles, and other derived licensed products, such as interferon, etc.

"Body fluids" means any liquid emanating or derived from humans and not limited to blood; dialysate; amniotic, cerebrospinal, synovial, pleural, peritoneal and pericardial fluids; and semen and vaginal secretions.

"Bypass stack" means a device used for discharging combustion gases to avoid severe damage to the air pollution control device or other equipment.

"Chemotherapeutic waste" means waste material resulting from the production or use of antineoplastic agents used for the purpose of stopping or reversing the growth of malignant cells.

"Co-fired combustor" means a unit combusting hospital waste and medical/infectious waste or both with other fuels or wastes (e.g., coal, municipal solid waste) and subject to an enforceable requirement limiting the unit to combusting a fuel feed stream, 10% or less of the weight of which is comprised, in aggregate, of hospital waste and medical/infectious waste as measured on a calendar quarter basis. For purposes of this definition, pathological waste, chemotherapeutic waste, and low-level radioactive waste are considered "other" wastes when calculating the percentage of hospital waste and medical/infectious waste combusted.

"Combustor" means any type of stationary equipment in which solid, liquid or gaseous fuels and refuse are burned (including, but not limited to, furnaces, ovens, and kilns) for the primary purpose of destroying matter or reducing the volume, or both, of the waste by removing combustible matter.

"Commenced" means an owner has undertaken a continuous program of construction or modification or that an owner has entered into a contractual obligation to undertake and complete, within a reasonable time, a continuous program of construction or modification.

"Compliance schedule" means a legally enforceable schedule specifying a date or dates by which a source must comply with specific emission limits contained in this article or with any increments of progress to achieve such compliance.

"Construction" means fabrication, erection, or installation of an affected facility.

"Continuous emission monitoring system" means a monitoring system for continuously measuring and recording the emissions of a pollutant from an affected facility.

"Continuous HMIWI" means an HMIWI that is designed to allow waste charging and ash removal during combustion.

"Dioxins/furans" means the combined emissions of tetra-through octa-chlorinated dibenzo-para-dioxins and dibenzofurans, as measured by Reference Method 23.

"Dry scrubber" means an add-on air pollution control system that injects dry alkaline sorbent (dry injection) or sprays an alkaline sorbent (spray dryer) to react with and neutralize acid gases in the HMIWI exhaust stream forming a dry powder material.

"Fabric filter" means an add-on air pollution control system that removes particulate matter and nonvaporous metals emissions by passing flue gas through filter bags.

"Facilities manager" means the individual in charge of purchasing, maintaining, and operating the HMIWI or the owner's representative responsible for the management of the HMIWI. Alternative titles may include director of facilities or vice president of support services.

"Federal operating permit" means a permit issued under Article 1 (9VAC5-80-50 et seq.) or Article 3 (9VAC5-80-360 et seq.) of Part II of 9VAC5 Chapter 80.

"High-air phase" means the stage of the batch operating cycle when the primary chamber reaches and maintains maximum operating temperatures.

"Hospital" means any facility which has an organized medical staff, maintains at least six inpatient beds, and where the primary function of the institution is to provide diagnostic and therapeutic patient services and continuous nursing care primarily to human inpatients who are not related and who stay on average in excess of 24 hours per admission. This definition does not include facilities maintained for the sole purpose of providing nursing or convalescent care to human patients who generally are not acutely ill but who require continuing medical supervision.

"Hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerator" or "HMIWI" or "HMIWI unit" means any device that combusts any amount of hospital waste and medical/infectious waste or both.

"Hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerator operator" or "HMIWI operator" means any person who operates, controls or supervises the day-to-day operation of an HMIWI.

"Hospital waste" means discards generated at a hospital, except unused items returned to the manufacturer. The definition of hospital waste does not include human corpses, remains, and anatomical parts that are intended for interment or cremation.

"Infectious agent" means any organism (such as a virus or bacteria) that is capable of being communicated by invasion and multiplication in body tissues and capable of causing disease or adverse health impacts in humans.

"Intermittent HMIWI" means an HMIWI that is designed to allow waste charging, but not ash removal, during combustion.

"Large HMIWI" means:

1. Except as provided in subdivision 2 of this definition:

a. An HMIWI whose maximum design waste burning capacity is more than 500 pounds per hour;

b. A continuous or intermittent HMIWI whose maximum charge rate is more than 500 pounds per hour; or

c. A batch HMIWI whose maximum charge rate is more than 4,000 pounds per day.

2. The following are not large HMIWI:

a. A continuous or intermittent HMIWI whose maximum charge rate is less than or equal to 500 pounds per hour; or

b. A batch HMIWI whose maximum charge rate is less than or equal to 4,000 pounds per day.

"Low-level radioactive waste" means waste material which contains radioactive nuclides emitting primarily beta or gamma radiation, or both, in concentrations or quantities that exceed applicable federal or state standards for unrestricted release. Low-level radioactive waste is not high-level radioactive waste, spent nuclear fuel, or by-product material as defined by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (42 USC § 2014(e)(2)).

"Malfunction" means any sudden, infrequent, and not reasonably preventable failure of air pollution control equipment, process equipment, or a process to operate in a normal or usual manner. Failures that are caused, in part, by poor maintenance or careless operation are not malfunctions. During periods of malfunction the HMIWI operator shall operate within established parameters as much as possible, and monitoring of all applicable operating parameters shall continue until all waste has been combusted or until the malfunction ceases, whichever comes first.

"Maximum charge rate" means:

1. For continuous and intermittent HMIWI, 110% of the lowest three-hour average charge rate measured during the most recent emissions test demonstrating compliance with all applicable emission limits.

2. For batch HMIWI, 110% of the lowest daily charge rate measured during the most recent emissions test demonstrating compliance with all applicable emission limits.

"Maximum design waste burning capacity" means:

1. For intermittent and continuous HMIWI,

C = PV X 15,000/8,500

where:

C = HMIWI capacity, lb/hr

PV = primary chamber volume, ft3

15,000 = primary chamber heat release rate factor, Btu/ft3/hr

8,500 = standard waste heating value, Btu/lb;

2. For batch HMIWI,

C = PV X 4.5/8

where:

C = HMIWI capacity, lb/hr

PV = primary chamber volume, ft3

4.5 = waste density, lb/ft3

8 = typical hours of operation of a batch HMIWI, hours.

"Maximum fabric filter inlet temperature" means 110% of the lowest three-hour average temperature at the inlet to the fabric filter (taken, at a minimum, once every minute) measured during the most recent emissions test demonstrating compliance with the dioxin/furan emission limit.

"Maximum flue gas temperature" means 110% of the lowest three-hour average temperature at the outlet from the wet scrubber (taken, at a minimum, once every minute) measured during the most recent emissions test demonstrating compliance with the mercury emission limit.

"Medical/infectious waste" means any waste generated in the diagnosis, treatment, or immunization of human beings or animals, in research pertaining thereto, or in the production or testing of biologicals that is listed in subdivisions 1 through 9 of this definition. The definition of medical/infectious waste does not include hazardous waste identified or listed under the regulations in 40 CFR Part 261; household waste, as defined in 40 CFR 261.4(b)(1); ash from incineration of medical/infectious waste, once the incineration process has been completed; human corpses, remains, and anatomical parts that are intended for interment or cremation; and domestic sewage materials identified in 40 CFR 261.4(a)(1).

1. Cultures and stocks of infectious agents and associated biologicals, including: cultures from medical and pathological laboratories; cultures and stocks of infectious agents from research and industrial laboratories; wastes from the production of biologicals; discarded live and attenuated vaccines; and culture dishes and devices used to transfer, inoculate, and mix cultures.

2. Human pathological waste, including tissues, organs, and body parts and body fluids that are removed during surgery or autopsy, or other medical procedures, and specimens of body fluids and their containers.

3. Human blood and blood products, regardless of whether containerized, including:

a. Liquid human blood;

b. Products of blood;

c. Items containing unabsorbed or free-flowing blood;

d. Items saturated or dripping or both with human blood; or

e. Items that were saturated or dripping or both with human blood that are now caked with dried human blood; including serum, plasma, and other blood components, and their containers, which were used or intended for use in either patient care, testing and laboratory analysis or the development of pharmaceuticals. Intravenous bags are also included in this category.

4. Regardless of the presence of infectious agents, sharps that have been used in animal or human patient care or treatment or in medical, research, or industrial laboratories, including hypodermic needles, syringes (with or without the attached needle), pasteur pipettes, scalpel blades, blood vials, needles with attached tubing, and culture dishes. Also included are other types of broken or unbroken glassware that may have been in contact with infectious agents, such as used slides and cover slips.

5. Animal waste including contaminated animal carcasses, body parts, and bedding of animals that were known to have been exposed to infectious agents during research (including research in veterinary hospitals), production of biologicals or testing of pharmaceuticals.

6. Isolation wastes including biological waste and discarded materials contaminated with blood, excretions, exudates, or secretions from humans who are isolated to protect others from certain highly communicable diseases, or isolated animals known to be infected with highly communicable diseases.

7. Unused sharps including the following unused, discarded sharps: hypodermic needles, suture needles, syringes, and scalpel blades.

8. Any waste that is contaminated or mixed with any waste listed in subdivisions 1 through 7 of this definition.

9. Any residue or contaminated soil, waste, or other debris resulting from the cleaning of a spill of any waste listed in subdivisions 1 through 8 of this definition.

"Medium HMIWI" means:

1. Except as provided in subdivision 2 of this definition:

a. An HMIWI whose maximum design waste burning capacity is more than 200 pounds per hour but less than or equal to 500 pounds per hour;

b. A continuous or intermittent HMIWI whose maximum charge rate is more than 200 pounds per hour but less than or equal to 500 pounds per hour; or

c. A batch HMIWI whose maximum charge rate is more than 1,600 pounds per day but less than or equal to 4,000 pounds per day.

2. The following are not medium HMIWI:

a. A continuous or intermittent HMIWI whose maximum charge rate is less than or equal to 200 pounds per hour or more than 500 pounds per hour; or

b. A batch HMIWI whose maximum charge rate is more than 4,000 pounds per day or less than or equal to 1,600 pounds per day.

"Minimum dioxin/furan sorbent flow rate" means 90% of the highest three-hour average dioxin/furan sorbent flow rate (taken, at a minimum, once every hour) measured during the most recent emissions test demonstrating compliance with the dioxin/furan emission limit.

"Minimum mercury sorbent flow rate" means 90% of the highest three-hour average mercury sorbent flow rate (taken, at a minimum, once every hour) measured during the most recent emissions test demonstrating compliance with the mercury emission limit.

"Minimum hydrogen chloride sorbent flow rate" means 90% of the highest three-hour average hydrogen chloride sorbent flow rate (taken, at a minimum, once every hour) measured during the most recent emissions test demonstrating compliance with the hydrogen chloride emission limit.

"Minimum horsepower or amperage" means 90% of the highest three-hour average horsepower or amperage to the wet scrubber (taken, at a minimum, once every minute) measured during the most recent emissions test demonstrating compliance with the applicable emission limits.

"Minimum pressure drop across the wet scrubber" means 90% of the highest three-hour average pressure drop across the wet scrubber particulate matter control device (taken, at a minimum, once every minute) measured during the most recent emissions test demonstrating compliance with the particulate matter emission limit.

"Minimum scrubber liquor flow rate" means 90% of the highest three-hour average liquor flow rate at the inlet to the wet scrubber (taken, at a minimum, once every minute) measured during the most recent emissions test demonstrating compliance with all applicable emission limits.

"Minimum scrubber liquor pH" means 90% of the highest three-hour average liquor pH at the inlet to the wet scrubber (taken, at a minimum, once every minute) measured during the most recent emissions test demonstrating compliance with the hydrogen chloride emission limit.

"Minimum secondary chamber temperature" means 90% of the highest three-hour average secondary chamber temperature (taken, at a minimum, once every minute) measured during the most recent emissions test demonstrating compliance with the particulate matter, carbon monoxide, or dioxin/furan emission limits.

"Modification" means any change to an HMIWI unit after March 16, 1998, such that:

1. The cumulative costs of the modifications, over the life of the unit, exceed 50% of the original cost of the construction and installation of the unit (not including the cost of any land purchased in connection with such construction or installation) updated to current costs; or

2. The change involves a physical change in or change in the method of operation of the unit which increases the amount of any air pollutant emitted by the unit for which standards have been established under § 111 or § 129 of the federal Clean Air Act.

"Operating day" means a 24-hour period between 12:00 midnight and the following midnight during which any amount of hospital waste or medical/infectious waste is combusted at any time in the HMIWI.

"Operation" means the period during which waste is combusted in the incinerator excluding periods of startup or shutdown.

"Particulate matter" means the total particulate matter emitted from an HMIWI as measured by Reference Method 5 or Reference Method 29.

"Pathological waste" means waste material consisting of only human or animal remains, anatomical parts, or tissue, the bags and containers used to collect and transport the waste material, and animal bedding (if applicable).

"Primary chamber" means the chamber in an HMIWI that receives waste material, in which the waste is ignited, and from which ash is removed.

"Pyrolysis" means the endothermic gasification of hospital waste or medical/infectious waste or both using external energy.

"Secondary chamber" means a component of the HMIWI that receives combustion gases from the primary chamber and in which the combustion process is completed.

"Shutdown" means the period of time after all waste has been combusted in the primary chamber. For continuous HMIWI, shutdown shall commence no less than two hours after the last charge to the incinerator. For intermittent HMIWI, shutdown shall commence no less than four hours after the last charge to the incinerator. For batch HMIWI, shutdown shall commence no less than five hours after the high-air phase of combustion has been completed.

"Small HMIWI" means:

1. Except as provided in subdivision 2 of this definition:

a. An HMIWI whose maximum design waste burning capacity is less than or equal to 200 pounds per hour;

b. A continuous or intermittent HMIWI whose maximum charge rate is less than or equal to 200 pounds per hour; or

c. A batch HMIWI whose maximum charge rate is less than or equal to 1,600 pounds per day.

2. The following are not small HMIWI:

a. A continuous or intermittent HMIWI whose maximum charge rate is more than 200 pounds per hour; or

b. A batch HMIWI whose maximum charge rate is more than 1,600 pounds per day.

"Small, rural HMIWI" means any small HMIWI which is located more than 50 miles from the boundary of the nearest Metropolitan Statistical Area and which burns less than 2,000 pounds per week of hospital waste and medical/infectious waste. The 2,000 pounds-per-week limitation does not apply during emissions tests.

"Startup" means the period of time between the activation of the system and the first charge to the unit. For batch HMIWI, startup means the period of time between activation of the system and ignition of the waste.

"Wet scrubber" means an add-on air pollution control device that utilizes an alkaline scrubbing liquor to collect particulate matter (including nonvaporous metals and condensed organics), and to absorb and neutralize acid gases, or both.

9VAC5-40-6020

9VAC5-40-6020. Standard for particulate matter. (Repealed.)

No owner or other person shall cause or permit to be discharged into the atmosphere from any HMIWI any particulate emissions in excess of the following limits:

1. For small HMIWI: 0.05 grains per dry standard cubic foot (115 milligrams per dry standard cubic meter).

2. For medium HMIWI: 0.03 grains per dry standard cubic foot (69 milligrams per dry standard cubic meter).

3. For large HMIWI: 0.015 grains per dry standard cubic foot (34 milligrams per dry standard cubic meter).

4. For small, rural HMIWI: 0.086 grains per dry standard cubic foot (197 milligrams per dry standard cubic meter).

9VAC5-40-6030

9VAC5-40-6030. Standard for carbon monoxide. (Repealed.)

No owner or other person shall cause or permit to be discharged into the atmosphere from any HMIWI any carbon monoxide emissions in excess of the following limits:

1. For small HMIWI: 40 parts per million by volume.

2. For medium HMIWI: 40 parts per million by volume.

3. For large HMIWI: 40 parts per million by volume.

4. For small, rural HMIWI: 40 parts per million by volume.

9VAC5-40-6040

9VAC5-40-6040. Standard for dioxins/furans. (Repealed.)

No owner or other person shall cause or permit to be discharged into the atmosphere from any HMIWI any dioxin/furan emissions in excess of the following limits:

1. For small HMIWI: 55 grains per dry billion standard cubic feet (125 nanograms per dry standard cubic meter) total dioxin/furan or 1.0 grains per billion standard cubic meter total TEQ (2.3 nanograms per dry standard cubic meter TEQ).

2. For medium HMIWI: 55 grains per billion dry standard cubic feet (125 nanograms per dry standard cubic meter) total dioxin/furan or 1.0 grains per billion standard cubic meter total TEQ (2.3 nanograms per dry standard cubic meter TEQ).

3. For large HMIWI: 55 grains per billion dry standard cubic feet (125 nanograms per dry standard cubic meter) total dioxin/furan or 1.0 grains per billion standard cubic meter total TEQ (2.3 nanograms per dry standard cubic meter TEQ).

4. For small, rural HMIWI: 350 grains per billion dry standard cubic feet (800 nanograms per dry standard cubic meter) total dioxin/furan or 6.6 grains per billion standard cubic meter total TEQ (15 nanograms per dry standard cubic meter TEQ).

9VAC5-40-6050

9VAC5-40-6050. Standard for hydrogen chloride. (Repealed.)

No owner or other person shall cause or permit to be discharged into the atmosphere from any HMIWI any hydrogen chloride emissions in excess of the following limits:

1. For small HMIWI: 100 parts per million by volume or 93% reduction.

2. For medium HMIWI: 100 parts per million by volume or 93% reduction.

3. For large HMIWI: 100 parts per million by volume or 93% reduction.

4. For small, rural HMIWI: 3,100 parts per million by volume.

9VAC5-40-6060

9VAC5-40-6060. Standard for sulfur dioxide. (Repealed.)

No owner or other person shall cause or permit to be discharged into the atmosphere from any HMIWI any sulfur dioxide emissions in excess of the following limits:

1. For small HMIWI: 55 parts per million by volume.

2. For medium HMIWI: 55 parts per million by volume.

3. For large HMIWI: 55 parts per million by volume.

4. For small, rural HMIWI: 55 parts per million by volume.

9VAC5-40-6070

9VAC5-40-6070. Standard for nitrogen oxides. (Repealed.)

No owner or other person shall cause or permit to be discharged into the atmosphere from any HMIWI any nitrogen oxide emissions in excess of the following limits:

1. For small HMIWI: 250 parts per million by volume.

2. For medium HMIWI: 250 parts per million by volume.

3. For large HMIWI: 250 parts per million by volume.

4. For small, rural HMIWI: 250 parts per million by volume.

9VAC5-40-6080

9VAC5-40-6080. Standard for lead. (Repealed.)

No owner or other person shall cause or permit to be discharged into the atmosphere from any HMIWI any lead emissions in excess of the following limits:

1. For small HMIWI: 0.52 grains per thousand dry standard cubic feet (1.2 milligrams per dry standard cubic meter) or 70% reduction.

2. For medium HMIWI: 0.52 grains per thousand dry standard cubic feet (1.2 milligrams per dry standard cubic meter) or 70% reduction.

3. For large HMIWI: 0.52 grains per thousand dry standard cubic feet (1.2 milligrams per dry standard cubic meter) or 70% reduction.

4. For small, rural HMIWI: 4.4 grains per thousand dry standard cubic feet (10 milligrams per dry standard cubic meter).

9VAC5-40-6090

9VAC5-40-6090. Standard for cadmium. (Repealed.)

No owner or other person shall cause or permit to be discharged into the atmosphere from any HMIWI any cadmium emissions in excess of the following limits:

1. For small HMIWI: 0.07 grains per thousand dry standard cubic feet (0.16 milligrams per dry standard cubic meter) or 65% reduction.

2. For medium HMIWI: 0.07 grains per thousand dry standard cubic feet (0.16 milligrams per dry standard cubic meter) or 65% reduction.

3. For large HMIWI: 0.07 grains per thousand dry standard cubic feet (0.16 milligrams per dry standard cubic meter).

4. For small, rural HMIWI: 1.7 grains per thousand dry standard cubic feet (4 milligrams per dry standard cubic meter).

9VAC5-40-6100

9VAC5-40-6100. Standard for mercury. (Repealed.)

No owner or other person shall cause or permit to be discharged into the atmosphere from any HMIWI any mercury emissions in excess of the following limits:

1. For small HMIWI: 0.24 grains per thousand dry standard cubic feet (0.55 milligrams per dry standard cubic meter) or 85% reduction.

2. For medium HMIWI: 0.24 grains per thousand dry standard cubic feet (0.55 milligrams per dry standard cubic meter) or 85% reduction.

3. For large HMIWI: 0.24 grains per thousand dry standard cubic feet (0.55 milligrams per dry standard cubic meter) or 85% reduction.

4. For small, rural HMIWI: 3.3 grains per thousand dry standard cubic feet (7.5 milligrams per dry standard cubic meter).

9VAC5-40-6110

9VAC5-40-6110. Standard for visible emissions. (Repealed.)

A. The provisions of Article 1 (9VAC5-40-60 et seq.) of 9VAC5 Chapter 40 (Emission Standards for Visible Emissions) apply except that the provisions in subsection B of this section apply instead of 9VAC5-40-80.

B. No owner or other person shall cause or permit to be discharged into the atmosphere from any HMIWI any visible emissions which exhibit greater than 10% opacity, six-minute block average. Failure to meet the requirements of this section because of the presence of condensed water vapor shall not be a violation of this section.

9VAC5-40-6120

9VAC5-40-6120. Standard for fugitive dust/emissions. (Repealed.)

The provisions of Article 1 (9VAC5-40-60 et seq.) of 9VAC5 Chapter 40 (Emission Standards for Fugitive Dust/Emissions, Rule 4-1) apply.

9VAC5-40-6130

9VAC5-40-6130. Standard for odor. (Repealed.)

The provisions of Article 2 (9VAC5-40-130 et seq.) of 9VAC5 Chapter 40 (Emission Standards for Odor, Rule 4-2) apply.

9VAC5-40-6140

9VAC5-40-6140. Standard for toxic pollutants. (Repealed.)

The provisions of Article 4 (9VAC5-60-200 et seq.) of 9VAC5 Chapter 60 (Emission Standards for Toxic Pollutants, Rule 6-4) apply.

9VAC5-40-6150

9VAC5-40-6150. HMIWI operator training and qualification. (Repealed.)

A. No owner of an affected facility shall allow the affected facility to operate at any time unless a fully trained and qualified HMIWI operator is accessible, either at the facility or available within one hour. The trained and qualified HMIWI operator may operate the HMIWI directly or be the direct supervisor of one or more HMIWI operators.

B. HMIWI operator training and qualification shall be obtained through a program approved by the board or by completing the requirements included in subsections C through G of this section.

C. Training shall be obtained by completing an HMIWI operator training course that includes, at a minimum, the following provisions:

1. Twenty-four hours of training on the following subjects:

a. Environmental concerns, including pathogen destruction and types of emissions;

b. Basic combustion principles, including products of combustion;

c. Operation of the type of incinerator to be used by the HMIWI operator, including proper startup, waste charging, and shutdown procedures;

d. Combustion controls and monitoring;

e. Operation of air pollution control equipment and factors affecting performance (if applicable);

f. Methods to monitor pollutants (continuous emission monitoring systems and monitoring of HMIWI and air pollution control device operating parameters) and equipment calibration procedures (where applicable);

g. Inspection and maintenance of the HMIWI, air pollution control devices, and continuous emission monitoring systems;

h. Actions to correct malfunctions or conditions that may lead to malfunction;

i. Bottom and fly ash characteristics and handling procedures;

j. Applicable federal, state, and local regulations;

k. Work safety procedures;

l. Pre-startup inspections; and

m. Recordkeeping requirements.

2. An examination designed and administered by the instructor.

3. Reference material distributed to the attendees covering the course topics.

D. Qualification shall be obtained by:

1. Completion of a training course that satisfies the criteria under subsection C of this section; and

2. Either six months experience as an HMIWI operator, six months experience as a direct supervisor of an HMIWI operator, or completion of at least two burn cycles under the observation of two qualified HMIWI operators.

E. Qualification is valid from the date on which the examination is passed or the completion of the required experience, whichever is later.

F. To maintain qualification, the trained and qualified HMIWI operator shall complete and pass an annual review or refresher course of at least four hours covering, at a minimum, the following:

1. Update of regulations;

2. Incinerator operation, including startup and shutdown procedures;

3. Inspection and maintenance;

4. Responses to malfunctions or conditions that may lead to malfunction; and

5. Discussion of operating problems encountered by attendees.

G. A lapsed qualification shall be renewed by one of the following methods:

1. For a lapse of less than three years, the HMIWI operator shall complete and pass a standard annual refresher course described in subsection F of this section.

2. For a lapse of three years or more, the HMIWI operator shall complete and pass a training course with the minimum criteria described in subsection C of this section.

H. The owner of an affected facility shall maintain documentation at the facility that address the following:

1. Summary of the applicable limits under this article;

2. Description of basic combustion theory applicable to an HMIWI;

3. Procedures for receiving, handling, and charging waste;

4. HMIWI startup, shutdown, and malfunction procedures;

5. Procedures for maintaining proper combustion air supply levels;

6. Procedures for operating the HMIWI and associated air pollution control systems within the limits established under this article;

7. Procedures for responding to periodic malfunction or conditions that may lead to malfunction;

8. Procedures for monitoring HMIWI emissions;

9. Reporting and recordkeeping procedures; and

10. Procedures for handling ash.

I. The owner of an affected facility shall establish a program for reviewing the information listed in subsection H of this section annually with each HMIWI operator.

1. The initial review of the information listed in subsection H of this section shall be conducted by January 1, 2001, or prior to assumption of responsibilities affecting HMIWI operation, whichever date is later.

2. Subsequent reviews of the information listed in subsection H of this section shall be conducted annually.

J. The information listed in subsection H of this section shall be kept in a readily accessible location for all HMIWI operators. This information, along with records of training shall be available for inspection by the board.

K. The initial training requirements of this section shall be performed by July 1, 2001.

L. The requirements of subsection B of this section with regard to obtaining operator training qualifications through a program approved by the board may be met by obtaining a license from the Board for Waste Management Facilities Operators. All training and licensing shall be in accordance with Chapter 22.1 (§ 54.1-2209 et seq.) of Title 54.1 of the Code of Virginia, and with 18VAC155 Chapter 20.

M. No owner of an affected facility shall allow the facility to be operated at any time unless a person is on duty who is responsible for the proper operation of the facility and has a license from the Board for Waste Management Facility operators in the correct classification. No provision of this article shall relieve any owner from the responsibility to comply in all respects with the requirements of Chapter 22.1 (§ 54.1-2209 et seq.) of Title 54.1 of the Code of Virginia, and with 18VAC155 Chapter 20.

9VAC5-40-6160

9VAC5-40-6160. Waste management plans. (Repealed.)

A. The owner of an affected facility shall prepare a waste management plan. The waste management plan shall identify both the feasibility and the approach to separate certain components of solid waste from the health care waste stream in order to reduce the amount of toxic emissions from incinerated waste. A waste management plan may include, but is not limited to, elements such as paper, cardboard, plastics, glass, battery, or metal recycling; or purchasing recycled or recyclable products. A waste management plan may include different goals or approaches for different areas or departments of the facility and need not include new waste management goals for every waste stream. It should identify, where possible, reasonably available additional waste management measures, taking into account the effectiveness of waste management measures already in place, the costs of additional measures, the emission reductions expected to be achieved, and any other environmental or energy impacts they might have. The American Hospital Association publication entitled "An Ounce of Prevention: Waste Reduction Strategies for Health Care Facilities" (see 9VAC5-20-21) shall be considered in the development of the waste management plan.

B. The waste management plan shall be submitted to the board no later than 60 days after the initial emissions test as required under 9VAC5-40-6180.

9VAC5-40-6170

9VAC5-40-6170. Inspections. (Repealed.)

A. The owner shall conduct an initial equipment inspection of each affected small, rural HMIWI by July 1, 2001. At a minimum, each inspection shall include the following:

1. Inspect all burners, pilot assemblies, and pilot sensing devices for proper operation; clean pilot flame sensor, as necessary;

2. Ensure proper adjustment of primary and secondary chamber combustion air, and adjust as necessary;

3. Inspect hinges and door latches, and lubricate as necessary;

4. Inspect dampers, fans, and blowers for proper operation;

5. Inspect HMIWI door and door gaskets for proper sealing;

6. Inspect motors for proper operation;

7. Inspect primary chamber refractory lining; clean and repair or replace lining as necessary;

8. Inspect incinerator shell for corrosion and hot spots;

9. Inspect secondary and tertiary chambers and stack, clean as necessary;

10. Inspect mechanical loader, including limit switches, for proper operation, if applicable;

11. Visually inspect waste bed (grates), and repair or seal, as appropriate;

12. For the burn cycle that follows the inspection, document that the incinerator is operating properly and make any necessary adjustments;

13. Inspect air pollution control device(s) for proper operation, if applicable;

14. Inspect waste heat boiler systems to ensure proper operation, if applicable;

15. Inspect bypass stack components;

16. Ensure proper calibration of thermocouples, sorbent feed systems and any other monitoring equipment; and

17. Generally observe that the equipment is maintained in good operating condition.

B. The owner shall conduct an equipment inspection of each affected small, rural HMIWI annually (no more than 12 months following the previous annual equipment inspection), as outlined in subsection A of this section.

C. Within 10 operating days following an equipment inspection all necessary repairs shall be completed unless the owner obtains written approval from the board establishing a date whereby all necessary repairs of the affected facility shall be completed.

9VAC5-40-6180

9VAC5-40-6180. Compliance, emissions testing, and monitoring. (Repealed.)

A. The provisions governing compliance, emissions testing, and monitoring shall be as follows:

1. With regard to the emissions standards in 9VAC5-40-6120, 9VAC5-40-6130, and 9VAC5-40-6140, the provisions of 9VAC5-40-20 (Compliance), 9VAC5-40-30 (Emission testing) and 9VAC5-40-40 (Monitoring) apply.

2. With regard to the emission limits in 9VAC5-40-6020 through 9VAC5-40-6110, the following provisions apply:

a. 9VAC5-40-20 B, C, D, and E.

b. 40 CFR 60.11.

c. 9VAC5-40-30 D and G.

d. 40 CFR 60.8, with the exception of paragraph (a).

e. 9VAC5-40-40 A and F.

f. 40 CFR 60.13.

g. Subsections B through N of this section.

B. The emission limits under this article apply at all times except during periods of startup, shutdown, or malfunction, provided that no hospital waste or medical/infectious waste is charged to the affected facility during startup, shutdown, or malfunction.

C. Except as provided in subsection L of this section, the owner of an affected facility shall conduct an initial emissions test by December 27, 2001, as required under this section to determine compliance with the emission limits using the procedures and test methods listed in this subsection. The use of the bypass stack during an emissions test shall invalidate the emissions test.

1. All emissions tests shall consist of a minimum of three test runs conducted under representative operating conditions.

2. The minimum sample time shall be one hour per test run unless otherwise indicated.

3. Reference Method 1 shall be used to select the sampling location and number of traverse points.

4. Reference Method 3 or 3A shall be used for gas composition analysis, including measurement of oxygen concentration. Reference Method 3 or 3A shall be used simultaneously with each reference method.

5. The pollutant concentrations shall be adjusted to 7.0% oxygen using the following equation:

Cadj = Cmeas (20.9-7)/(20.9-% O2)

where:

Cadj = pollutant concentration adjusted to 7.0% oxygen;

Cmeas = pollutant concentration measured on a dry basis;

(20.9-7) = 20.9% oxygen-7.0% oxygen (defined oxygen correction basis);

20.9 = oxygen concentration in air, percent; and

% O2 = oxygen concentration measured on a dry basis, percent.

6. Reference Method 5 or 29 be used to measure the particulate matter emissions.

7. Reference Method 9 shall be used to measure stack opacity.

8. Reference Method 10 or 10B shall be used to measure the carbon monoxide emissions.

9. Reference Method 23 shall be used to measure total dioxin/furan emissions. The minimum sample time shall be four hours per test run. If the affected facility has selected the toxic equivalency limits for dioxin/furans, under 9VAC5-40-6040, the following procedures shall be used to determine compliance:

a. Measure the concentration of each dioxin/furan tetra-through octa-congener emitted using Reference Method 23.

b. For each dioxin/furan congener measured in accordance with subdivision 9 a of this subsection, multiply the congener concentration by its corresponding toxic equivalency factor specified in Table 4-44A of this article.

 

TABLE 4-44A.
TOXIC EQUIVALANCY FACTORS.

 

Dioxon/furan congener

Toxic equivalency factor

 

2,3,7,8‑tetrachlorinated dibenzo‑p‑dioxin

1

 

1,2,3,7,8‑pentachlorinated dibenzo‑p‑dioxin

0.5

 

1,2,3,4,7,8‑hexachlorinated dibenzo‑p‑dioxin

0.1

 

1,2,3,7,8,9‑hexachlorinated dibenzo‑p‑dioxin

0.1

 

1,2,3,6,7,8‑hexachlorinated dibenzo‑p‑dioxin

0.1

 

1,2,3,4,6,7,8‑heptachlorinated dibenzo‑p‑dioxin

0.01

 

octachlorinated dibenzo‑p‑dioxin

0.001

 

2,3,7,8‑tetrachlorinated dibenzofuran

0.1

 

2,3,4,7,8‑pentachlorinated dibenzofuran

0.5

 

1,2,3,7,8‑pentachlorinated dibenzofuran

0.05

 

1,2,3,4,7,8‑hexachlorinated dibenzofuran

0.1

 

1,2,3,6,7,8‑hexachlorinated dibenzofuran

0.1

 

1,2,3,7,8,9‑hexachlorinated dibenzofuran

0.1

 

2,3,4,6,7,8‑hexachlorinated dibenzofuran

0.1

 

1,2,3,4,6,7,8‑heptachlorinated dibenzofuran

0.01

 

1,2,3,4,7,8,9‑heptachlorinated dibenzofuran

0.01

 

Octachlorinated dibenzofuran

0.001

c. Sum the products calculated in accordance with subdivision 9 b of this subsection to obtain the total concentration of dioxins/furans emitted in terms of toxic equivalency.

10. Reference Method 26 shall be used to measure hydrogen chloride emissions. If the affected facility has selected the percentage reduction limits for hydrogen chloride under 9VAC5-40-6050, the percentage reduction in hydrogen chloride emissions (% RHCl) is computed using the following formula:

Description: http://leg5.state.va.us/images/434972747807LEGLDH_files/image001.gif

where:

% RHCl = percentage reduction of hydrogen chloride emissions achieved;

Ei = hydrogen chloride emission concentration measured at the control device inlet, corrected to 7.0% oxygen (dry basis); and

Eo = hydrogen chloride emission concentration measured at the control device outlet, corrected to 7.0% oxygen (dry basis).

11. Reference Method 29 shall be used to measure lead, cadmium, and mercury emissions. If the affected facility has selected the percentage reduction limits for metals under 9VAC5-40-6080, 9VAC5-40-6090, or 9VAC5-40-6100, the percentage reduction in emissions (% Rmetal) is computed using the following formula:

Description: http://leg5.state.va.us/images/434972747807LEGLDH_files/image002.gif

where:

% Rmetal = percentage reduction of metal emission (lead, cadmium, or mercury) achieved;

Ei = metal emission concentration (lead, cadmium, or mercury) measured at the control device inlet, corrected to 7.0% oxygen (dry basis); and

Eo = metal emission concentration (lead, cadmium, or mercury) measured at the control device outlet, corrected to 7.0% oxygen (dry basis).

D. Following the date on which the initial emissions test is completed or is required to be completed under this section, whichever date comes first, the owner of an affected facility shall:

1. Determine compliance with the opacity limit by conducting an annual emissions test (no more than 12 months following the previous emissions test) using the applicable procedures and test methods listed in subsection C of this section.

2. Determine compliance with the particulate matter, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen chloride emission limits by conducting an annual emissions test (no more than 12 months following the previous emissions test) using the applicable procedures and test methods listed in subsection C of this section. If all three emissions tests over a three-year period indicate compliance with the emission limit for a pollutant (particulate matter, carbon monoxide, or hydrogen chloride), the owner may forego an emissions test for that pollutant for the subsequent two years. At a minimum, an emissions test for particulate matter, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen chloride shall be conducted every third year (no more than 36 months following the previous emissions test). If an emissions test conducted every third year indicates compliance with the emission limit for a pollutant (particulate matter, carbon monoxide, or hydrogen chloride), the owner may forego an emissions test for that pollutant for an additional two years. If any emissions test indicates noncompliance with the respective emission limit, an emissions test for that pollutant shall be conducted annually until all annual emissions tests over a three-year period indicate compliance with the emission limit. The use of the bypass stack during an emissions test shall invalidate the emissions test.

3. Facilities using a continuous emission monitoring system to demonstrate compliance with any of the emission limits under 9VAC5-40-6020 through 9VAC5-40-6100 shall:

a. Determine compliance with the appropriate emission limit(s) using a 12-hour rolling average, calculated each hour as the average of the previous 12 operating hours (not including startup, shutdown, or malfunction).

b. Operate all continuous emission monitoring systems in accordance with the applicable procedures under Appendices B and F of 40 CFR Part 60.

E. The owner of an affected facility equipped with a dry scrubber followed by a fabric filter, a wet scrubber, or a dry scrubber followed by a fabric filter and wet scrubber shall:

1. Establish the appropriate maximum and minimum operating parameters, indicated in Table 4-44B of this article for each control system, as site specific operating parameters during the initial emissions test to determine compliance with the emission limits; and

TABLE 4-44 B.
OPERATING PARAMETERS TO BE MONITORED AND MINIMUM MEASUREMENT AND RECORDING FREQUENCIES.

 

OPERATING PARAMETERS TO BE MONITORED

MINIMUM FREQUENCY

CONTROL SYSTEM

 

DATA MEASUREMENT

DATA RECORDING

DRY SCRUBBER/ FABRIC FILTER

WET SCRUBBER

DRY SCRUBBER/ FABRIC FILTER AND WET SCRUBBER

MAXIMUM OPERATING PARAMETERS

 

MAXIMUM CHARGE RATE

1 X CHARGE

1 X CHARGE

X

X

X

 

MAXIMUM FABRIC FILTER INLET TEMPERATURE

CONTINUOUS

1 X MINUTE

X

 

X

 

MAXIMUM FLUE GAS TEMP

CONTINUOUS

1 X MINUTE

X

X

 

 

MINIMUM OPERATING PARAMETERS

 

MINIMUM SECONDARY CHAMBER TEMP

CONTINUOUS

1 X MINUTE

X

X

X

 

MINIMUM DIOXIN/FURAN SORBENT FLOW RATE

HOURLY

1 X HOUR

X

 

X

 

MINIMUM HCl SORBENT FLOW RATE

HOURLY

1 X HOUR

X

 

X

 

MINIMUM Hg SORBENT FLOW RATE

HOURLY

1 X HOUR

X

 

X

 

MINIMUM PRESSURE DROP ACROSS WET SCRUBBER OR MINIMUM HORSEPOWER OR AMPERAGE TO WET SCRUBBER

CONTINUOUS

1 X MINUTE

 

X

X

 

MINIMUM SCRUBBER LIQUOR FLOW RATE

CONTINUOUS

1 X MINUTE

 

X

X

 

MINIMUM SCRUBBER LIQUOR pH

CONTINUOUS

1 X MINUTE

 

X

X

 

2. Following the date on which the initial emissions test is completed or is required to be completed under subsection B of this section, whichever date comes first, ensure that the affected facility does not operate above any of the applicable maximum operating parameters or below any of the applicable minimum operating parameters listed in Table 4-44B of this article and measured as three-hour rolling averages (calculated each hour as the average of the previous three operating hours) at all times except during periods of startup, shutdown and malfunction. Operating parameter limits do not apply during emissions tests. Operation above the established maximum or below the established minimum operating parameters shall constitute a violation of established operating parameters.

F. Except as provided in subsection I of this section, for affected facilities equipped with a dry scrubber followed by a fabric filter:

1. Operation of the affected facility above the maximum charge rate and below the minimum secondary chamber temperature (each measured on a three-hour rolling average) simultaneously shall constitute a violation of the carbon monoxide emission limit.

2. Operation of the affected facility above the maximum fabric filter inlet temperature, above the maximum charge rate, and below the minimum dioxin/furan sorbent flow rate (each measured on a three-hour rolling average) simultaneously shall constitute a violation of the dioxin/furan emission limit.

3. Operation of the affected facility above the maximum charge rate and below the minimum hydrogen chloride sorbent flow rate (each measured on a three-hour rolling average) simultaneously shall constitute a violation of the hydrogen chloride emission limit.

4. Operation of the affected facility above the maximum charge rate and below the minimum mercury sorbent flow rate (each measured on a three-hour rolling average) simultaneously shall constitute a violation of the mercury emission limit.

5. Use of the bypass stack (except during startup, shutdown, or malfunction) shall constitute a violation of the particulate matter, dioxin/furan, hydrogen chloride, lead, cadmium, and mercury emission limits.

G. Except as provided in subsection I of this section, for affected facilities equipped with a wet scrubber:

1. Operation of the affected facility above the maximum charge rate and below the minimum pressure drop across the wet scrubber or below the minimum horsepower or amperage to the system (each measured on a three-hour rolling average) simultaneously shall constitute a violation of the particulate matter emission limit.

2. Operation of the affected facility above the maximum charge rate and below the minimum secondary chamber temperature (each measured on a three-hour rolling average) simultaneously shall constitute a violation of the carbon monoxide emission limit.

3. Operation of the affected facility above the maximum charge rate, below the minimum secondary chamber temperature, and below the minimum scrubber liquor flow rate (each measured on a three-hour rolling average) simultaneously shall constitute a violation of the dioxin/furan emission limit.

4. Operation of the affected facility above the maximum charge rate and below the minimum scrubber liquor pH (each measured on a three-hour rolling average) simultaneously shall constitute a violation of the hydrogen chloride emission limit.

5. Operation of the affected facility above the maximum flue gas temperature and above the maximum charge rate (each measured on a three-hour rolling average) simultaneously shall constitute a violation of the mercury emission limit.

6. Use of the bypass stack (except during startup, shutdown, or malfunction) shall constitute a violation of the particulate matter, dioxin/furan, hydrogen chloride, lead, cadmium, and mercury emission limits.

H. Except as provided in subsection I of this section, for affected facilities equipped with a dry scrubber followed by a fabric filter and a wet scrubber:

1. Operation of the affected facility above the maximum charge rate and below the minimum secondary chamber temperature (each measured on a three-hour rolling average) simultaneously shall constitute a violation of the carbon monoxide emission limit.

2. Operation of the affected facility above the maximum fabric filter inlet temperature, above the maximum charge rate, and below the minimum dioxin/furan sorbent flow rate (each measured on a three-hour rolling average) simultaneously shall constitute a violation of the dioxin/furan emission limit.

3. Operation of the affected facility above the maximum charge rate and below the minimum scrubber liquor pH (each measured on a three-hour rolling average) simultaneously shall constitute a violation of the hydrogen chloride emission limit.

4. Operation of the affected facility above the maximum charge rate and below the minimum mercury sorbent flow rate (each measured on a three-hour rolling average) simultaneously shall constitute a violation of the mercury emission limit.

5. Use of the bypass stack (except during startup, shutdown, or malfunction) shall constitute a violation of the particulate matter, dioxin/furan, hydrogen chloride, lead, cadmium, and mercury emission limits.

I. The owner of an affected facility may conduct a repeat emissions test within 30 days of violation of applicable operating parameters to demonstrate that the affected facility is not in violation of the applicable emission limits. Repeat emissions tests conducted pursuant to this subsection shall be conducted using the identical operating parameters that indicated a violation under subsection F, G, or H of this section.

J. The owner of an affected facility using an air pollution control device other than a dry scrubber followed by a fabric filter, a wet scrubber, or a dry scrubber followed by a fabric filter and a wet scrubber to comply with the emission limits under 9VAC5-40-6020 through 9VAC5-40-6100 shall petition the board for other site-specific operating parameters to be established during the initial emissions test and continuously monitored thereafter. The owner shall not conduct the initial emissions test until after the petition has been approved by the board.

K. The owner of an affected facility may conduct a repeat emissions test at any time to establish new values for the operating parameters. The board may request a repeat emissions test at any time.

L. Small, rural HMIWIs subject to the emission limits under 9VAC5-40-6020 through 9VAC5-40-6100 shall meet the following compliance and emissions testing requirements:

1. Conduct the emissions testing requirements in subdivisions C 1 through 9, C 11 (mercury only), and D 1 of this section. The 2,000 lb/week limitation under 9VAC5-40-6010 does not apply during emissions tests.

2. Establish maximum charge rate and minimum secondary chamber temperature as site-specific operating parameters during the initial emissions test to determine compliance with applicable emission limits.

3. Following the date on which the initial emissions test is completed or is required to be completed under subsection C of this section, whichever date comes first, ensure that the affected facility does not operate above the maximum charge rate or below the minimum secondary chamber temperature measured as three-hour rolling averages (calculated each hour as the average of the previous three operating hours) at all times except during periods of startup, shutdown and malfunction. Operating parameter limits do not apply during emissions tests. Operation above the maximum charge rate or below the minimum secondary chamber temperature shall constitute a violation of the established operating parameters.

4. Except as provided in subdivision C 5 of this section, operation of the affected facility above the maximum charge rate and below the minimum secondary chamber temperature (each measured on a three-hour rolling average) simultaneously shall constitute a violation of the particulate matter, carbon monoxide, and dioxin/furan emission limits.

5. The owner of an affected facility may conduct a repeat emissions test within 30 days of violation of applicable operating parameters to demonstrate that the affected facility is not in violation of the applicable emission limits. Repeat emissions tests conducted pursuant to this subsection must be conducted using the identical operating parameters that indicated a violation under subdivision 4 of this subsection.

M. Owners of affected facilities shall perform monitoring as follows, except as provided for under subsection N of this section:

1. The owner of an affected facility shall install, calibrate (to manufacturers' specifications), maintain, and operate devices (or establish methods) for monitoring the applicable maximum and minimum operating parameters listed in Table 4-44B of this article such that these devices (or methods) measure and record values for these operating parameters at the frequencies indicated in Table 4-44B of this article at all times except during periods of startup and shutdown.

2. The owner of an affected facility shall install, calibrate (to manufacturers' specifications), maintain, and operate a device or method for measuring the use of the bypass stack including date, time, and duration.

3. The owner of an affected facility using something other than a dry scrubber followed by a fabric filter, a wet scrubber, or a dry scrubber followed by a fabric filter and a wet scrubber to comply with the emission limits under 9VAC5-40-6020 through 9VAC5-40-6100 shall install, calibrate (to the manufacturers' specifications), maintain, and operate the equipment necessary to monitor the site-specific operating parameters developed pursuant to subsection J of this section.

4. The owner of an affected facility shall obtain monitoring data at all times during HMIWI operation except during periods of monitoring equipment malfunction, calibration, or repair. At a minimum, valid monitoring data shall be obtained for 75% of the operating hours per day for 90% of the operating days per calendar quarter that the affected facility is combusting hospital waste and medical/infectious waste or both.

N. Small, rural HMIWI subject to the emission limits under 9VAC5-40-6020 through 9VAC5-40-6100 shall meet the following monitoring requirements:

1. Install, calibrate (to manufacturers' specifications), maintain, and operate a device for measuring and recording the temperature of the secondary chamber on a continuous basis, the output of which shall be recorded, at a minimum, once every minute throughout operation.

2. Install, calibrate (to manufacturers' specifications), maintain, and operate a device which automatically measures and records the date, time, and weight of each charge fed into the HMIWI.

3. The owner of an affected facility shall obtain monitoring data at all times during HMIWI operation except during periods of monitoring equipment malfunction, calibration, or repair. At a minimum, valid monitoring data shall be obtained for 75% of the operating hours per day for 90% of the operating hours per calendar quarter that the affected facility is combusting hospital waste and medical/infectious waste or both.

9VAC5-40-6190

9VAC5-40-6190. Recordkeeping and reporting. (Repealed.)

A. The provisions of governing recordkeeping and reporting shall be as follows:

1. With regard to the emissions standards in 9VAC5-40-6120, 9VAC5-40-6130, and 9VAC5-40-6140, the provisions of 9VAC5-40-50 (Notification, records and reporting) apply.

2. With regard to the emission limits in 9VAC5-40-6020 through 9VAC5-40-6110, the following provisions apply:

a. 9VAC5-40-50 F and H.

b. 40 CFR 60.7.

c. Subsections B through G of this section.

B. The owner of an affected facility shall maintain the following information (as applicable) for a period of at least five years:

1. Calendar date of each record;

2. Records of the following data:

a. Concentrations of any pollutant listed in 9VAC5-40-6020 through 9VAC5-40-6100 or measurements of opacity as determined by the continuous emission monitoring system (if applicable);

b. HMIWI charge dates, times, and weights and hourly charge rates;

c. Fabric filter inlet temperatures during each minute of operation, as applicable;

d. Amount and type of dioxin/furan sorbent used during each hour of operation, as applicable;

e. Amount and type of mercury sorbent used during each hour of operation, as applicable;

f. Amount and type of hydrogen chloride sorbent used during each hour of operation, as applicable;

g. Secondary chamber temperatures recorded during each minute of operation;

h. Liquor flow rate to the wet scrubber inlet during each minute of operation, as applicable;

i. Horsepower or amperage to the wet scrubber during each minute of operation, as applicable;

j. Pressure drop across the wet scrubber system during each minute of operation, as applicable;

k. Temperature at the outlet from the wet scrubber during each minute of operation, as applicable;

l. pH at the inlet to the wet scrubber during each minute of operation, as applicable;

m. Records indicating use of the bypass stack, including dates, times, and durations; and

n. For affected facilities complying with 9VAC5-40-6180 J and 9VAC5-40-6180 M 3, the owner shall maintain all operating parameter data collected.

3. Identification of calendar days for which data on emission rates or operating parameters specified under subdivision 2 of this subsection have not been obtained, with an identification of the emission rates or operating parameters not measured, reasons for not obtaining the data, and a description of corrective actions taken.

4. Identification of calendar days, times and durations of malfunctions, a description of the malfunction and the corrective action taken.

5. Identification of calendar days for which data on emission rates or operating parameters specified under subdivision 2 of this subsection exceeded the applicable limits, with a description of the exceedances, reasons for such exceedances, and a description of corrective actions taken.

6. The results of the initial, annual, and any subsequent emissions tests conducted to determine compliance with the emission limits or to establish operating parameters, as applicable.

7. Records showing the names of HMIWI operators who have completed review of the information in 9VAC5-40-6150 H as required by 9VAC5-40-6150 I, including the date of the initial review and all subsequent annual reviews.

8. Records showing the names of the HMIWI operators who have completed the HMIWI operator training requirements, including documentation of training and the dates of the training.

9. Records showing the names of the HMIWI operators who have met the criteria for qualification under 9VAC5-40-6150 and the dates of their qualification.

10. Records of calibration of any monitoring devices as required under 9VAC5-40-6180 M 1, 2 and 3.

C. The owner of an affected facility shall submit the information specified in this subsection no later than 60 days following the initial emissions test. All reports shall be signed by the facilities manager.

1. The initial emissions test data as recorded under 9VAC5-40-6180 C 1 through 11, as applicable.

2. The values for the site-specific operating parameters established pursuant to 9VAC5-40-6180 E or J, as applicable.

3. The waste management plan as specified in 9VAC5-40-6150.

D. An annual report shall be submitted one year following the submission of the information in subsection C of this section and subsequent reports shall be submitted no more than 12 months following the previous report (once the unit is subject to a federal operating permit as provided in 9VAC5-40-6000 F, the owner of an affected facility must submit these reports semiannually). The annual report shall include the information specified in this subsection. All reports shall be signed by the facilities manager.

1. The values for the site-specific operating parameters established pursuant to 9VAC5-40-6180 E or J, as applicable.

2. The highest maximum operating parameter and the lowest minimum operating parameter, as applicable, for each operating parameter recorded for the calendar year being reported, pursuant to 9VAC5-40-6180 E or J, as applicable.

3. The highest maximum operating parameter and the lowest minimum operating parameter, as applicable for each operating parameter recorded pursuant to 9VAC5-40-6180 E or J for the calendar year preceding the year being reported, in order to provide the board with a summary of the performance of the affected facility over a two-year period.

4. Any information recorded under subdivisions B 3 through 5 of this section for the calendar year being reported.

5. Any information recorded under subdivisions B 3 through 5 of this section for the calendar year preceding the year being reported, in order to provide the board with a summary of the performance of the affected facility over a two-year period.

6. If an emissions test was conducted during the reporting period, the results of that test.

7. If no exceedances or malfunctions were reported under subdivisions B 3 through 5 of this section for the calendar year being reported, a statement that no exceedances occurred during the reporting period.

8. Any use of the bypass stack, the duration, reason for malfunction, and corrective action taken.

E. The owner of an affected facility shall submit semiannual reports containing any information recorded under subdivisions B 3 through 5 of this section no later than 60 days following the reporting period. The first semiannual reporting period ends six months following the submission of information in subsection C of this section. Subsequent reports shall be submitted no later than six calendar months following the previous report. All reports shall be signed by the facilities manager.

F. All records specified under subsection B of this section shall be maintained onsite in either paper copy or computer-readable format, unless an alternative format is approved by the board.

G. The owner of each small, rural HMIWI shall:

1. Maintain records of the annual equipment inspections, any required maintenance, and any repairs not completed within 10 days of an inspection or the timeframe established by the board; and

2. Submit an annual report containing information recorded under subdivision 1 of this subsection no later than 60 days following the year in which data were collected. Subsequent reports shall be sent no later than 12 calendar months following the previous report (once the unit is subject to a federal operating permit as provided in 9VAC5-40-6000 F, the owner must submit these reports semiannually). The report shall be signed by the facilities manager.

9VAC5-40-6200

9VAC5-40-6200. Compliance schedules. (Repealed.)

A. Except as provided in subsection B of this section, owners shall:

1. Comply with the emission limits in this article as expeditiously as possible but in no case later than July 1, 2001, and

2. Conduct the initial emissions test of the air pollution control device no later than December 27, 2001.

B. Until January 1, 2001, owners of affected facilities may petition the board for an extension to the compliance date in subsection A of this section. This petition shall include the following:

1. Documentation of the analyses undertaken to support the need for an extension, including an explanation of why until September 15, 2002, is needed to comply with this article while compliance by July 1, 2001, is not feasible. The documentation shall also include an evaluation of the option to transport the waste offsite to a commercial medical waste treatment and disposal facility on a temporary or permanent basis; and

2. Documentation of measurable and enforceable incremental steps of progress to be taken towards compliance with the emission guidelines, including:

a. If applicable, date for submitting a petition for site-specific operating parameters under 40 CFR 60.56c(i);

b. Date for submittal of the control plan;

c. Date for obtaining services of an architectural and engineering firm regarding the air pollution control device(s);

d. Date for obtaining design drawings of the air pollution control device(s);

e. Date for ordering the air pollution control device(s);

f. Date for obtaining the major components of the air pollution control device(s);

g. Date for initiation of site preparation for installation of the air pollution control device(s);

h. Date for initiation of installation of the air pollution control device(s);

i. Date for initial startup of the air pollution control device(s);

j. Date for initial emissions test(s) of the air pollution control device(s); and

k. Date for final compliance.

9VAC5-40-6210

9VAC5-40-6210. Registration. (Repealed.)

The provisions of 9VAC5-20-160 (Registration) apply.

9VAC5-40-6220

9VAC5-40-6220. Facility and control equipment maintenance or malfunction. (Repealed.)

The provisions governing facility and control equipment maintenance or malfunction shall be as follows:

1. With regard to the emissions standards in 9VAC5-40-6120, 9VAC5-40-6130, and 9VAC5-40-6140, the provisions of 9VAC5-20-180 (Facility and control equipment maintenance or malfunction) apply.

2. With regard to the emission limits in 9VAC5-40-6020 through 9VAC5-40-6110, the following provisions apply:

a. 9VAC5-20-180 A, B, C, D, H, and I.

b. 9VAC5-40-6180 B.

c. 9VAC5-40-6190 B 4, 7 and 8.

9VAC5-40-6230

9VAC5-40-6230. Permits. (Repealed.)

A permit may be required prior to beginning any of the activities specified below if the provisions of 9VAC5 Chapter 50 (9VAC5-50-10 et seq.) and 9VAC5 Chapter 80 (9VAC5-80-10 et seq.) apply. Owners contemplating such action should review those provisions and contact the appropriate regional office for guidance on whether those provisions apply.

1. Construction of a facility.

2. Reconstruction (replacement of more than half) of a facility.

3. Modification (any physical change to equipment) of a facility.

4. Relocation of a facility.

5. Reactivation (restart-up) of a facility.

6. Operation of a facility.