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9VAC25-580-10

Part I
Definitions, Applicability and Interim Prohibition

9VAC25-580-10. Definitions.

The following words and terms when used in this chapter shall have the following meanings unless the context clearly indicates otherwise:

"Aboveground release" means any release to the surface of the land or to surface water. This includes, but is not limited to, releases from the aboveground portion of a UST system and aboveground releases associated with overfills and transfer operations as the regulated substance moves to or from a UST system.

"Ancillary equipment" means any devices including, but not limited to, such devices as piping, fittings, flanges, valves, and pumps used to distribute, meter, or control the flow of regulated substances to and from an UST.

"Below ground release" means any release to the subsurface of the land and to ground water. This includes, but is not limited to, releases from the belowground portions of an underground storage tank system and belowground releases associated with overfills and transfer operations as the regulated substance moves to or from an underground storage tank.

"Beneath the surface of the ground" means beneath the ground surface or otherwise covered with earthen materials.

"Board" means the State Water Control Board.

"Building official" means the executive official of the local government building department empowered by § 36-105 of the Code of Virginia to enforce and administer the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code (USBC).

"Cathodic protection" is a technique to prevent corrosion of a metal surface by making that surface the cathode of an electrochemical cell. For example, a tank system can be cathodically protected through the application of either galvanic anodes or impressed current.

"Cathodic protection tester" means a person who can demonstrate an understanding of the principles and measurements of all common types of cathodic protection systems as applied to buried or submerged metal piping and tank systems. At a minimum, such persons must have education and experience in soil resistivity, stray current, structure-to-soil potential, and component electrical isolation measurements of buried metal piping and tank systems.

"CERCLA" means the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, as amended (42 USC § 9601 et seq.).

"Compatible" means the ability of two or more substances to maintain their respective physical and chemical properties upon contact with one another for the design life of the tank system under conditions likely to be encountered in the UST.

"Community water system" means a public water system that serves at least 15 service connections used by year-round residents or regularly serves at least 25 year-round residents.

"Connected piping" means all underground piping including valves, elbows, joints, flanges, and flexible connectors attached to a tank system through which regulated substances flow. For the purpose of determining how much piping is connected to any individual UST system, the piping that joins two UST systems should be allocated equally between them.

"Corrosion expert" means a person who, by reason of thorough knowledge of the physical sciences and the principles of engineering and mathematics acquired by a professional education and related practical experience, is qualified to engage in the practice of corrosion control on buried or submerged metal piping systems and metal tanks. Such a person must be accredited or certified as being qualified by the National Association of Corrosion Engineers or be a registered professional engineer who has certification or licensing that includes education and experience in corrosion control of buried or submerged metal piping systems and metal tanks.

"De minimis" means trivial and beyond the intent of regulation, as that term is used at 53 Fed. Reg. 37108-37109.

"Delivery prohibition" is prohibiting the delivery, deposit, or acceptance of product to an underground storage tank system that has been determined to be ineligible by the board for such delivery, deposit, or acceptance.

"Delivery prohibition tag" means a tag, device, or mechanism on the tank's fill pipes that clearly identifies an underground storage tank system as ineligible for product delivery. The tag or device is easily visible to the product deliverer and clearly states and conveys that it is unlawful to deliver to, deposit into, or accept product into the ineligible underground storage tank system. The tag, device, or mechanism is generally tamper resistant.

"Dielectric material" means a material that does not conduct direct electrical current. Dielectric coatings are used to electrically isolate UST systems from the surrounding soils. Dielectric bushings are used to electrically isolate portions of the UST system (e.g., tank from piping).

"Director" means the director of the Department of Environmental Quality.

"Electrical equipment" means underground equipment that contains dielectric fluid that is necessary for the operation of equipment such as transformers and buried electrical cable.

"Excavation zone" means the volume containing the tank system and backfill material bounded by the ground surface, walls, and floor of the pit and trenches into which the UST system is placed at the time of installation.

"Existing community water system or existing potable drinking water well" means a community water system or potable drinking water well is in place when a new installation or replacement of an underground tank, piping, or motor fuel dispensing system begins.

"Existing tank system" means a tank system used to contain an accumulation of regulated substances or for which installation has commenced on or before December 22, 1988. Installation is considered to have commenced if:

1. The owner or operator has obtained all federal, state, and local approvals or permits necessary to begin physical construction of the site or installation of the tank system; and if

2. a. Either a continuous on-site physical construction or installation program has begun; or

b. The owner or operator has entered into contractual obligations-which cannot be cancelled or modified without substantial loss-for physical construction at the site or installation of the tank system to be completed within a reasonable time.

"Farm tank" is a tank located on a tract of land devoted to the production of crops or raising animals, including fish, and associated residences and improvements. A farm tank must be located on the farm property. "Farm" includes fish hatcheries, rangeland and nurseries with growing operations.

"Flow-through process tank" is a tank that forms an integral part of a production process through which there is a steady, variable, recurring, or intermittent flow of materials during the operation of the process. Flow-through process tanks do not include tanks used for the storage of materials prior to their introduction into the production process or for the storage of finished products or by-products from the production process.

"Free product" refers to a regulated substance that is present as a nonaqueous phase liquid (e.g., liquid not dissolved in water).

"Gathering lines" means any pipeline, equipment, facility, or building used in the transportation of oil or gas during oil or gas production or gathering operations.

"Hazardous substance UST system" means an underground storage tank system that contains a hazardous substance defined in § 101(14) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 (42 USC § 9601 et seq.) (but not including any substance regulated as a hazardous waste under subtitle C of RCRA) or any mixture of such substances and petroleum, and which is not a petroleum UST system.

"Heating oil" means petroleum that is No. 1, No. 2, No. 4-light, No. 4-heavy, No. 5-light, No. 5-heavy, and No. 6 technical grades of fuel oil; other residual fuel oils (including Navy Special Fuel Oil and Bunker C); and other fuels when used as substitutes for one of these fuel oils. Heating oil is typically used in the operation of heating equipment, boilers, or furnaces.

"Hydraulic lift tank" means a tank holding hydraulic fluid for a closed-loop mechanical system that uses compressed air or hydraulic fluid to operate lifts, elevators, and other similar devices.

"Liquid trap" means sumps, well cellars, and other traps used in association with oil and gas production, gathering, and extraction operations (including gas production plants), for the purpose of collecting oil, water, and other liquids. These liquid traps may temporarily collect liquids for subsequent disposition or reinjection into a production or pipeline stream, or may collect and separate liquids from a gas stream.

"Maintenance" means the normal operational upkeep to prevent an underground storage tank system from releasing product.

"Motor fuel" means petroleum or a petroleum-based substance that is motor gasoline, aviation gasoline, No. 1 or No. 2 diesel fuel, or any grade of gasohol, and is typically used in the operation of a motor engine. This definition applies to blended petroleum motor fuels such as biodiesel and ethanol blends that contain more than a de minimis amount of petroleum or petroleum-based substance.

"Motor fuel dispenser system" means the motor fuel dispenser and the equipment necessary to connect the dispenser to the underground storage tank system. The equipment necessary to connect the motor fuel dispenser to the underground storage tank system may include check valves, shear valves, unburied risers or flexible connectors, or other transitional components that are beneath the dispenser and connect the dispenser to the underground piping.

"New tank system" means a tank system that will be used to contain an accumulation of regulated substances and for which installation has commenced after December 22, 1988 (See also "existing tank system").

"Noncommercial purposes" with respect to motor fuel means not for resale.

"On the premises where stored" with respect to heating oil means UST systems located on the same property where the stored heating oil is used.

"Operational life" refers to the period beginning when installation of the tank system has commenced until the time the tank system is properly closed under Part VII (9VAC25-580-310 et seq.) of this chapter.

"Operator" means any person in control of, or having responsibility for, the daily operation of the UST system.

"Overfill release" is a release that occurs when a tank is filled beyond its capacity, resulting in a discharge of the regulated substance to the environment.

"Owner" means:

1. In the case of a UST system in use on November 8, 1984, or brought into use after that date, any person who owns an UST system used for storage, use, or dispensing of regulated substances; and

2. In the case of any UST system in use before November 8, 1984, but no longer in use on that date, any person who owned such UST immediately before the discontinuation of its use.

The term "owner" shall not include any person who, without participating in the management of an underground storage tank or being otherwise engaged in petroleum production, refining, and marketing, holds indicia of ownership primarily to protect the holder's security interest in the tank.

"Person" means an individual, trust, firm, joint stock company, corporation, including a government corporation, partnership, association, any state or agency thereof, municipality, county, town, commission, political subdivision of a state, any interstate body, consortium, joint venture, commercial entity, the government of the United States or any unit or agency thereof.

"Petroleum UST system" means an underground storage tank system that contains petroleum or a mixture of petroleum with de minimis quantities of other regulated substances. Such systems include those containing motor fuels, jet fuels, distillate fuel oils, residual fuel oils, lubricants, petroleum solvents, and used oils.

"Pipe" or "piping" means a hollow cylinder or the tubular conduit that is constructed of nonearthen materials that routinely contains and conveys regulated substances from the underground tank(s) to the dispenser(s) or other end-use equipment. Such piping includes any elbows, couplings, unions, valves, or other in-line fixtures that contain and convey regulated substances from the underground tank(s) to the dispenser(s). Pipe or piping does not include vent, vapor recovery, or fill lines.

"Pipeline facilities (including gathering lines)" are new and existing pipe rights-of-way and any associated equipment, facilities, or buildings.

"Potable drinking water well" means any hole (dug, driven, drilled, or bored) that extends into the earth until it meets groundwater that supplies water for a noncommunity public water system, or otherwise supplies water for household use (consisting of drinking, bathing, cooking, or other similar uses). Such wells may provide water to entities such as a single-family residence, group of residences, businesses, schools, parks, campgrounds, and other permanent or seasonal communities.

"Product deliverer" is any person who delivers or deposits product into an underground storage tank.

"Public water system" means a system for the provision to the public of water for human consumption through pipes or, after August 5, 1998, other constructed conveyances, if such system has at least 15 service connections or regularly serves an average of at least 25 individuals daily at least 60 days out of the year. Such term includes (i) any collection, treatment, storage, and distribution facilities under control of the operator of such system and used primarily in connection with such system and (ii) any collection or pretreatment storage facilities not under such control that are used primarily in connection with such system. Such term does not include any "special irrigation district." A public water system is either a "community water system" or a "noncommunity water system."

"RCRA" means the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 as amended (42 USC § 6901 et seq.).

"Regulated substance" means an element, compound, mixture, solution, or substance that, when released into the environment, may present substantial danger to the public health or welfare, or the environment. The term "regulated substance" includes:

1. Any substance defined in § 101(14) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 (42 USC § 9601 et seq.), but not any substance regulated as a hazardous waste under subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 (42 USC § 6901 et seq.); and

2. Petroleum, including crude oil or any fraction thereof, that is liquid at standard conditions of temperature and pressure (60°F and 14.7 pounds per square inch absolute). The term "regulated substance" includes but is not limited to petroleum and petroleum-based substances comprised of a complex blend of hydrocarbons derived from crude oil through processes of separation, conversion, upgrading, and finishing, such as motor fuels, jet fuels, distillate fuel oils, residual fuel oils, lubricants, petroleum solvents, and used oils.

"Release" means any spilling, leaking, emitting, discharging, escaping, leaching or disposing from an UST into ground water, surface water or subsurface soils.

"Release detection" means determining whether a release of a regulated substance has occurred from the UST system into the environment or into the interstitial space between the UST system and its secondary barrier or secondary containment around it.

"Repair" means to restore a tank or UST system component that has caused a release of product from the UST system.

"Replace" means, when applied to underground storage tanks and piping, to remove an underground storage tank and install a new underground storage tank or to remove and put back greater than 50% of the length of a piping run excluding connectors (such as flexible connectors) connected to an underground storage tank.

"Residential tank" is a tank located on property used primarily for dwelling purposes.

"SARA" means the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986.

"Secondary containment" means a release prevention and release detection system for an underground tank and/or piping. For purposes of this definition, release prevention means an underground tank and/or piping having an inner and outer barrier and release detection means a method of monitoring the space between the inner and outer barriers for a leak or release of regulated substances from the underground tank and/or piping.

"Septic tank" is a water-tight covered receptacle designed to receive or process, through liquid separation or biological digestion, the sewage discharged from a building sewer. The effluent from such receptacle is distributed for disposal through the soil and settled solids and scum from the tank are pumped out periodically and hauled to a treatment facility.

"Storm water or waste water collection system" means piping, pumps, conduits, and any other equipment necessary to collect and transport the flow of surface water run-off resulting from precipitation, or domestic, commercial, or industrial wastewater to and from retention areas or any areas where treatment is designated to occur. The collection of storm water and wastewater does not include treatment except where incidental to conveyance.

"Surface impoundment" is a natural topographic depression, man-made excavation, or diked area formed primarily of earthen materials (although it may be lined with man-made materials) that is not an injection well.

"Tank" is a stationary device designed to contain an accumulation of regulated substances and constructed of nonearthen materials (e.g., concrete, steel, plastic) that provide structural support.

"Underdispenser containment" means containment underneath a dispenser that will prevent leaks from the dispenser from reaching soil or groundwater.

"Underground area" means an underground room, such as a basement, cellar, shaft or vault, providing enough space for physical inspection of the exterior of the tank situated on or above the surface of the floor.

"Underground release" means any belowground release.

"Underground storage tank" or "UST" means any one or combination of tanks (including underground pipes connected thereto) that is used to contain an accumulation of regulated substances, and the volume of which (including the volume of underground pipes connected thereto) is 10% or more beneath the surface of the ground. This term does not include any:

1. Farm or residential tank of 1,100 gallons or less capacity used for storing motor fuel for noncommercial purposes;

2. Tank used for storing heating oil for consumption on the premises where stored;

3. Septic tank;

4. Pipeline facility (including gathering lines) regulated under:

a. The Regulated under the Natural Gas Pipeline Safety Act of 1968 (49 USC App. § 1671, et seq.);

b. The Regulated under the Hazardous Liquid Pipeline Safety Act of 1979 (49 USC App. § 2001, et seq.); or

c. Which is an intrastate pipeline facility regulated under state laws comparable to the provisions of the law referred to in subdivisions 4 a or 4 b of this definition;

5. Surface impoundment, pit, pond, or lagoon;

6. Storm water or wastewater collection system;

7. Flow-through process tank;

8. Liquid trap or associated gathering lines directly related to oil or gas production and gathering operations; or

9. Storage tank situated in an underground area (such as a basement, cellar, mineworking, drift, shaft, or tunnel) if the storage tank is situated upon or above the surface of the floor.

The term "underground storage tank" or "UST" does not include any pipes connected to any tank which is described in subdivisions 1 through 9 of this definition.

"Upgrade" means the addition or retrofit of some systems such as cathodic protection, lining, or spill and overfill controls to improve the ability of an underground storage tank system to prevent the release of product.

"UST system" or "tank system" means an underground storage tank, connected underground piping, underground ancillary equipment, and containment system, if any.

"Wastewater treatment tank" means a tank that is designed to receive and treat an influent wastewater through physical, chemical, or biological methods.

9VAC25-580-20

9VAC25-580-20. Applicability.

A. The requirements of this chapter apply to all owners and operators of an UST system as defined in 9VAC25-580-10 except as otherwise provided in subsections B, C, and D of this section. Any UST system listed in subsection C of this section must meet the requirements of 9VAC25-580-30.

B. The following UST systems are excluded from the requirements of this chapter:

1. Any UST system holding hazardous wastes listed or identified under Subtitle C of the Solid Waste Disposal Act (33 USC § 1251 et seq.), or a mixture of such hazardous waste and other regulated substances.

2. Any wastewater treatment tank system that is part of a wastewater treatment facility regulated under § 402 or § 307(b) of the Clean Water Act.

3. Equipment or machinery that contains regulated substances for operational purposes such as hydraulic lift tanks and electrical equipment tanks.

4. Any UST system whose capacity is 110 gallons or less.

5. Any UST system that contains a de minimis concentration of regulated substances.

6. Any emergency spill or overflow containment UST system that is expeditiously emptied after use.

C. Deferrals. Parts II, III, IV, V, and VII, and IX of this chapter do not apply to any of the following types of UST systems:

1. Wastewater treatment tank systems;

2. Any UST systems containing radioactive material that are regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (42 USC § 2011 et seq.);

3. Any UST system that is part of an emergency generator system at nuclear power generation facilities regulated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission under 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix A;

4. Airport hydrant fuel distribution systems; and

5. UST systems with field-constructed tanks.

D. Deferrals. Part IV does not apply to any UST system that was installed beforeSeptember 15, 2010 (i.e., ] the effective date of the secondary containment requirements in subdivision 7 of 9VAC25-580-50) ] and stores fuel solely for use by emergency power generators.

9VAC25-580-50

Part II
UST Systems: Design, Construction, Installation, and Notification

9VAC25-580-50. Performance standards for new UST systems.

Owners and operators must obtain a permit, the required inspections and a Certificate of Use issued in accordance with the provisions of the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code. No UST system shall be installed or placed into use without the owner and operator having obtained the required permit, inspections and Certificate of Use from the building official under the provisions of the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code ( [ Chapter 6 ( ] § 36-97 et seq. [ ) of Title 36 ] of the Code of Virginia).

In the case of state-owned facilities the Department of General Services shall function as the building official in accordance with § 36-98.1 of the Code of Virginia.

In the case of federal facilities the building official must be contacted. Owners and operators must obtain a permit, the required inspections and a Certificate of Use must be issued in accordance with the provisions of the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code.

In order to prevent releases due to structural failure, corrosion, or spills and overfills for as long as the UST system is used to store regulated substances, all owners and operators of new UST systems must meet the following requirements.

1. Tanks.

Each tank must be properly designed and constructed, and any portion underground that routinely contains product must be protected from corrosion, in accordance with a code of practice developed by a nationally recognized association or independent testing laboratory as specified below:

a. The tank is constructed of fiberglass-reinforced plastic;

NOTE: The following industry codes may be used to comply with subdivision 1 a of this section: Underwriters Laboratories Standard 1316, "Standard for Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Plastic Underground Storage Tanks for Petroleum Products"; Underwriters Laboratories of Canada CAN4-S615-M83, "Standard for Reinforced Plastic Underground Tanks for Petroleum Products"; or American Society of Testing and Materials Standard D4021-86, "Standard Specification for Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Polyester Underground Petroleum Storage Tanks."

b. The tank is constructed of steel and cathodically protected in the following manner:

(1) The tank is coated with a suitable dielectric material;

(2) Field-installed cathodic protection systems are designed by a corrosion expert;

(3) Impressed current systems are designed to allow determination of current operating status as required in subdivision 3 of 9VAC25-580-90; and

(4) Cathodic protection systems are operated and maintained in accordance with 9VAC25-580-90; or

NOTE: The following codes and standards may be used to comply with subdivision 1 b of this section:

(a) Steel Tank Institute "Specification for STI-P3 System of External Corrosion Protection of Underground Steel Storage Tanks";

(b) Underwriters Laboratories Standard 1746, "Corrosion Protection Systems for Underground Storage Tanks";

(c) Underwriters Laboratories of Canada CAN4-S603-M85, "Standard for Steel Underground Tanks for Flammable and Combustible Liquids," and CAN4-G03.1-M85, "Standard for Galvanic Corrosion Protection Systems for Underground Tanks for Flammable and Combustible Liquids," and CAN4-S631-M84, "Isolating Bushings for Steel Underground Tanks Protected with Coatings and Galvanic Systems"; or

(d) National Association of Corrosion Engineers Standard RP-02-85, "Control of External Corrosion on Metallic Buried, Partially Buried, or Submerged Liquid Storage Systems," and Underwriters Laboratories Standard 58 "Standard for Steel Underground Tanks for Flammable and Combustible Liquids."

c. The tank is constructed of a steel-fiberglass-reinforced-plastic composite; or

NOTE: The following industry codes may be used to comply with subdivision 1 c of this section: Underwriters Laboratories Standard 1746, "Corrosion Protection Systems for Underground Storage Tanks," or the Association for Composite Tanks ACT-100, "Specification for the Fabrication of FRP Clad Underground Storage Tanks."

d. The tank construction and corrosion protection are determined by the board to be designed to prevent the release or threatened release of any stored regulated substance in a manner that is no less protective of human health and the environment than subdivisions 1 a through c of this section.

2. Piping. The piping that routinely contains regulated substances and is in contact with the ground must be properly designed, constructed, and protected from corrosion in accordance with a code of practice developed by a nationally recognized association or independent testing laboratory as specified below:

a. The piping is constructed of fiberglass-reinforced plastic.

NOTE: The following codes and standards may be used to comply with subdivision 2 a of this section:

(1) Underwriters Laboratories Subject 971, "UL Listed Non-Metal Pipe Nonmetallic Underground Piping for Flammable Liquids";

(2) Underwriters Laboratories Standard 567, "Pipe Connectors for Flammable and Combustible and LP Gas";

(3) Underwriters Laboratories of Canada Guide ULC-107, "Glass Fiber Reinforced Plastic Pipe and Fittings for Flammable Liquids"; and

(4) Underwriters Laboratories of Canada Standard CAN 4-S633-M81, "Flexible Underground Hose Connectors."

b. The piping is constructed of steel and cathodically protected in the following manner:

(1) The piping is coated with a suitable dielectric material;

(2) Field-installed cathodic protection systems are designed by a corrosion expert;

(3) Impressed current systems are designed to allow determination of current operating status as required in subdivision 3 of 9VAC25-580-90; and

(4) Cathodic protection systems are operated and maintained in accordance with 9VAC25-580-90; or

NOTE: The following codes and standards may be used to comply with subdivision 2 b of this section:

(a) National Fire Protection Association Standard 30, "Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code";

(b) American Petroleum Institute Publication 1615, "Installation of Underground Petroleum Storage Systems";

(c) American Petroleum Institute Publication 1632, "Cathodic Protection of Underground Petroleum Storage Tanks and Piping Systems"; and

(d) National Association of Corrosion Engineers Standard RP-01-69, "Control of External Corrosion on Submerged Metallic Piping Systems."

c. The piping construction and corrosion protection are determined by the board to be designed to prevent the release or threatened release of any stored regulated substance in a manner that is no less protective of human health and the environment than the requirements in subdivisions 2 a through b of this section.

3. Spill and overfill prevention equipment.

a. Except as provided in subdivision 3 b of this section, to prevent spilling and overfilling associated with product transfer to the UST system, owners and operators must use the following spill and overfill prevention equipment:

(1) Spill prevention equipment that will prevent release of product to the environment when the transfer hose is detached from the fill pipe (for example, a spill catchment basin); and

(2) Overfill prevention equipment that will:

(a) Automatically shut off flow into the tank when the tank is no more than 95% full;

(b) Alert the transfer operator when the tank is no more than 90% full by restricting the flow into the tank or triggering a high-level alarm; or

(c) Restrict the flow 30 minutes prior to overfilling, alert the operator with a high level alarm one minute before overfilling, or automatically shut off flow into the tank so that none of the fittings located on top of the tank are exposed to product due to overfilling.

b. Owners and operators are not required to use the spill and overfill prevention equipment specified in subdivision 3 a of this section if:

(1) Alternative equipment is used that is determined by the board to be no less protective of human health and the environment than the equipment specified in subdivision 3 a (1) or (2) of this section; or

(2) The UST system is filled by transfers of no more than 25 gallons at one time.

4. Installation. All tanks and piping must be properly installed in accordance with a code of practice developed by a nationally recognized association or independent testing laboratory and in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions.

NOTE: Tank and piping system installation practices and procedures described in the following codes may be used to comply with the requirements of subdivision 4 of this section:

a. American Petroleum Institute Publication 1615, "Installation of Underground Petroleum Storage System";

b. Petroleum Equipment Institute Publication RP100, "Recommended Practices for Installation of Underground Liquid Storage Systems"; or

c. American National Standards Institute Standard B31.3, "Petroleum Refinery Piping," and American National Standards Institute Standard B31.4 "Liquid Petroleum Transportation Piping System."

NOTE: These industry codes require that prior to bringing the system into use the following tests be performed: (i) tank tightness test (air); (ii) pipe tightness test (air or hydrostatic); and (iii) precision system test in accordance with NFPA 329 (detection of .05 gal/hr leak rate).

5. Certification of installation. All owners and operators must ensure that one or more of options a through d of the following methods of certification, testing, or inspection is performed, and a Certificate of Use has been issued in accordance with the provisions of the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code to demonstrate compliance with subdivision 4 of this section. A certification of compliance on the UST Notification form must be submitted to the board in accordance with 9VAC25-580-70.

a. The installer has been certified by the tank and piping manufacturers;

b. The installation has been inspected and certified by a registered professional engineer with education and experience in UST system installation;

c. All work listed in the manufacturer's installation checklists has been completed; or

d. The owner and operator have complied with another method for ensuring compliance with subdivision 4 of this section that is determined by the board to be no less protective of human health and the environment.

6. Release detection. Release detection shall be provided in accordance with Part IV (9VAC25-580-130 et seq.) of this chapter.

7. Secondary containment.

a. Each new or replaced petroleum underground storage tank, or piping connected to any petroleum underground storage tank, installed within 1,000 feet of any existing community water system or existing potable drinking water well must be secondarily contained in accordance with 9VAC25-580-140 A. In the case of a replacement of a petroleum underground storage tank or the piping connected to the petroleum underground storage tank, the secondary containment requirements shall apply only to the specific petroleum underground storage tank or piping run being replaced, not to other petroleum underground storage tanks and connected pipes comprising such system. The entire piping run must be secondarily contained if more than 50% of the length of a piping run connected to a petroleum underground storage tank is to be replaced.

b. Motor fuel dispenser systems. Each new motor fuel dispenser system installed within 1,000 feet of any existing community water system or existing potable drinking water well shall have underdispenser containment in accordance with 9VAC25-580-140 B. A motor fuel dispenser system is considered new when:

(1) A dispenser is installed at a location where there previously was no dispenser (new UST system or new dispenser location at an existing UST system), or

(2) An existing dispenser is removed and replaced with another dispenser and the equipment used to connect the dispenser to the UST system is replaced. This equipment may include unburied flexible connectors or risers or other transitional components that are beneath the dispenser and connect the dispenser to the piping.

c. If an owner or operator intends to install a new petroleum UST system that is located greater than 1,000 feet from any existing community water system or existing potable drinking water well and the owner or operator will install a potable drinking water well at the new facility that is within 1,000 feet of the petroleum underground storage tanks, piping, or motor fuel dispenser systems as part of the new UST installation, then secondary containment and underdispenser containment are required, regardless of whether the well is installed before or after the petroleum underground storage tanks, piping, and motor fuel dispenser systems are installed.

d. A tank owner or operator who intends to install an UST system or motor fuel dispenser system that will not meet the requirements in subdivision 7 a or c of this subsection must demonstrate to the board that the distance from the proposed new or replacement petroleum underground storage tank or piping or motor fuel dispenser system to the existing community water system or existing potable drinking water well is greater than 1,000 feet.

(1) The tank owner or operator shall make such a demonstration by submitting to the board a map showing the distance from the proposed new or replacement petroleum underground storage tank or piping or motor fuel dispenser system to the existing community water system or existing potable drinking water well. If the distance is greater than 1,000 feet but less than 2,000 feet, the map must be prepared by a licensed professional surveyor. If the distance is greater than 2,000 feet, the map is not required to be prepared by a licensed professional surveyor. The tank owner or operator must submit the map to the board at least 30 days prior to the installation.

(2) The map must delineate the distance from the proposed new or replacement petroleum underground storage tank or piping or motor fuel dispenser system to the closest existing community water system or existing potable drinking water well. The distance must be measured from the closest part of the proposed new or replacement petroleum underground storage tank or piping or motor fuel dispenser system to:

(a) The closest part of the nearest existing community water system including such components as the location of the wellhead(s) for ground water or location of the intake point(s) for surface water, water lines, processing tanks, and water storage tanks; and water distribution or service lines under the control of the community water system operator; and

(b) The wellhead of the nearest existing potable drinking water well.

e. The requirement for secondary containment does not apply to:

(1) Petroleum underground storage tanks that are not new or not replaced in a manifolded UST system;

(2) Piping runs that are not new or not replaced on petroleum underground storage tanks with multiple piping runs;

(3) Suction piping that meets the requirements at 9VAC 25-580-140 C 2 b  [ (1) through (5) ] or piping that manifolds two or more petroleum USTs together;

(4) Repairs meant to restore a petroleum underground storage tank, pipe, or dispenser to operating condition. For purposes of this subsection, a repair is any activity that does not meet the definition of "replace"; and

(5) Other instances approved by the board where equivalent protection is provided.

9VAC25-580-120

9VAC25-580-120. Reporting and recordkeeping.

Owners and operators of UST systems must cooperate fully with inspections, monitoring and testing conducted by the board, as well as requests for document submission, testing, and monitoring by the owner or operator pursuant to § 9005 of Subtitle I of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as amended.

1. Reporting. Owners and operators must submit the following information to the board:

a. Notification for all UST systems (9VAC25-580-70), which includes certification of installation for new UST systems (9VAC25-580-50 5) (subdivision 5 of 9VAC25-580-50),

b. Reports of all releases including suspected releases (9VAC25-580-190), spills and overfills (9VAC25-580-220), and confirmed releases (9VAC25-580-240);

c. Corrective actions planned or taken including initial abatement measures (9VAC25-580-250), site characterization (9VAC25-580-260), free product removal (9VAC25-580-270), and corrective action plan (9VAC25-580-280); and

d. An amended notification form must be submitted within 30 days after permanent closure or change-in-service (9VAC25-580-320).

2. Recordkeeping. Owners and operators must maintain the following information:

a. Documentation of operation of corrosion protection equipment (9VAC25-580-90);

b. Documentation of UST system repairs (9VAC25-580-110 6) (subdivision 6 of 9VAC25-580-110);

c. Recent compliance with release detection requirements (9VAC25-580-180); and

d. Results of the site investigation conducted at permanent closure (9VAC25-580-350).

e. Documentation of operator training required by 9VAC25-580-125, including verification of training for current Class A, Class B, and Class C operators, and current list of operators and written instructions or procedures for Class C operators in accordance with 9VAC25-580-125 (relating to operator training).

3. Availability and maintenance of records. Owners and operators must keep the records required either:

a. At the UST site and immediately available for inspection by the board; or

b. At a readily available alternative site and be provided for inspection to the board upon request.

In the case of permanent closure records required under 9VAC25-580-350, owners and operators are also provided with the additional alternative of mailing closure records to the board if they cannot be kept at the site or an alternative site as indicated above.

9VAC25-580-125

9VAC25-580-125. Operator training.

A. Definitions.

1. For purposes of this section, "Class A operator" means an operator who has primary responsibility to operate and maintain the underground storage tank system and facility. The Class A operator's responsibilities include managing resources and personnel, such as establishing work assignments, to achieve and maintain compliance with regulatory requirements. In general, Class A operators focus on the broader aspects of the underground storage tank statutory and regulatory requirements and standards necessary to properly operate and maintain the underground storage tank system and facility.

2. For purposes of this section, "Class B operator" means an operator who implements applicable underground storage tank regulatory requirements and standards in the field or at the underground storage tank facility. A Class B operator oversees and implements the day-to-day aspects of operations, maintenance, and recordkeeping for the underground storage tanks at one or more facilities.

3. For purposes of this section, "Class C operator" means the person responsible for responding to alarms or other indications of emergencies caused by spills or releases from underground storage tank systems and equipment failures. A Class C operator, generally, is the first line of response to events indicating emergency conditions.

B. Requirements for trained operators.

1. Owners and operators of UST systems shall designate Class A, Class B, and Class C operators for each UST system or facility that has underground storage tanks.

a. A person may be designated for more than one class of operator.

b. Any person designated for more than one class of operator shall successfully complete the required training under subsection C of this section for each operator class for which he is designated.

c. Persons trained in accordance with subsection C of this section may perform operator duties consistent with their training when employed or contracted by the tank owner or operator to perform these functions.

2. Designated operators shall successfully complete required training under subsection C of this section no later than August 8, 2012.

3. Class A operators shall be familiar with training requirements for each class of operator and may provide required training for Class C operators.

4. Class B operators shall be familiar with Class B and Class C operator responsibilities and may provide training for Class C operators.

5. Trained operators shall be readily available to respond to suspected/confirmed releases, other unusual operating conditions and equipment shut-offs or failures.

a. The Class A or Class B operator shall be available for immediate telephone consultation when an UST facility is in operation. A Class A or Class B operator shall be able to be onsite at the facility within24 hours a reasonable time to perform necessary functions ].

b. For manned facilities, a Class C operator shall be onsite whenever the UST facility is in operation. Aftereffective date September 15, 2010, ] written instructions or procedures shall be maintained and visible at manned UST facilities for persons performing duties of the Class C operator to follow and to provide notification necessary in the event of emergency conditions.

c. For unmanned facilities, a Class C operator shall be available for immediate telephone consultation and shall be able to be onsite withintwo hours of being contacted a reasonable time to perform necessary functions ]. Emergency contact information shall be prominently displayed at the site. Aftereffective date September 15, 2010, ] written instructions or procedures shall be maintained and visible at unmanned UST facilities for persons performing duties of the Class C operator to follow and to provide notification necessary in the event of emergency conditions.

C. Required training.

1. Class A operators shall successfully complete a training course approved by the board that includes a general knowledge of UST system requirements. Training shall provide information that should enable the operator to make informed decisions regarding compliance and ensuring that appropriate persons are fulfilling operation, maintenance, and recordkeeping requirements and standards of this chapter and/or federal underground storage tank requirements in 40 CFR Part 280 (relating to technical standards and corrective action requirements for owners and operators of underground storage tanks (UST)), including, at a minimum, the following:

a. Spill and overfill prevention;

b. Release detection and related reporting requirements;

c. Corrosion protection;

d. Emergency response;

e. Product and equipment compatibility;

f. Financial responsibility;

g. Notification and storage tank registration requirements;

h. Temporary and permanent closure requirements; and

i. Class B and Class C operator training requirements.

2. Class B operators shall successfully complete a training course approved by the board that includes an in-depth understanding of operation and maintenance aspects of UST systems and related regulatory requirements. Training shall provide specific information on the components of UST systems, materials of construction, methods of release detection and release prevention applied to UST systems and components. Training shall address operation and maintenance requirements of this chapter and/or federal underground storage tank requirements in 40 CFR Part 280, including, at a minimum, the following:

a. Spill and overfill prevention;

b. Release detection and related reporting requirements;

c. Corrosion protection and related testing;

d. Emergency response;

e. Product and equipment compatibility;

f. Reporting and recordkeeping requirements; and

g. Class C operator training requirements.

3. Class C operators. At a minimum, training provided by the tank owner or Class A or Class B operator shall enable the Class C operator to take action in response to emergencies caused by spills or releases and alarms from an underground storage tank. Training shall include written instructions or procedures for the Class C operator to follow and to provide notification necessary in the event of emergency conditions.

4. Successful completion for Class A and Class B operators means completion of the entire training course and demonstration of knowledge of the course material as follows:

a. Receipt of a passing grade (a score of 80% or better) on an examination of material presented in the training course, or demonstration through practical (hands-on) application to the trainer of operation and maintenance checks of underground storage tank equipment, including performance of release detection at the UST facility, at the conclusion of onsite training; and

b. Receipt of a training certificate by an approved trainer upon verification of successful completion of training under this section.

5. Reciprocity. The board may also recognize successful completion of Class A and Class B operator training on regulatory standards consistent with 40 CFR Part 280, which is recognized by other state or implementing agencies and which is approved by EPA as meeting operator training grant guidelines published by EPA.

6. The tank owner and operator shall incur the costs of the training.

D. Timing of training.

1. An owner and operator shall ensure that Class A, Class B and Class C operators are trained as soon as practicable aftereffective date September 15, 2010, ] contingent upon availability of approved training providers, but not later than August 8, 2012.

2. When a Class A or Class B operator is replaced after August 8, 2012, a new operator shall be trained within 60 days of assuming duties for that class of operator.

3. Class C operators shall be trained before assuming duties of a Class C operator. Aftereffective date September 15, 2010, ] written instructions or procedures shall be provided to Class C operators to follow and to provide notification necessary in the event of emergency conditions. Class C operators shall be briefed on these instructions or procedures at least annually (every 12 months), which may be concurrent with annual safety training required under Occupational Safety and Health Administration, 29 CFR Part 1910 (relating to Occupational Safety and Health Standards).

E. Retraining.

1. Owners and operators of UST systems shall ensure that Class A and B operators in accordance with subsection C of this section are retrained if the board determines that the UST system is out of compliance with the requirements of 9VAC25-580-30 through 9VAC25-580-190. At a minimum, Class A and Class B operators shall successfully complete retraining in the areas identified as out of compliance.

2. Class A and B operators shall complete training pursuant to this subsection no later than 90 days from the date the board identifies the noncompliance.

F. Documentation.

1. Owners and operators of underground storage tank facilities shall prepare and maintain a list of designated Class A, Class B, and Class C operators. The list shall represent the current Class A, Class B, and Class C operators for the UST facility and shall include:

a. The name of each operator, class of operation trained for, and the date each operator successfully completed initial training and refresher training, if any.

b. For Class A and Class B operators that are not permanently onsite or assigned to more than one facility, telephone numbers to contact the operators.

2. A copy of the certificates of training for Class A and Class B operators shall be on fileas long as each operator serves in that capacity at the facility or three years, whichever is longer, ] and readily available, ] and a copy of the facility list of Class A, Class B, and Class C operators and Class C operator instructions or procedures shall be kept onsite and immediately available for manned UST facilities and readily available for unmanned facilities (see subdivision 2 e of 9VAC25-580-120 relating to reporting and recordkeeping).

3. Class C operator and owner contact information, including names and telephone numbers, and any emergency information shall be conspicuously posted at unmanned facilities.

9VAC25-580-130

Part IV
Release Detection

9VAC25-580-130. General requirements for all petroleum and hazardous substance UST systems.

A. Owners and operators of new and existing UST systems must provide a method, or combination of methods, of release detection that:

1. Can detect a release from any portion of the tank and the connected underground piping that routinely contains product;

2. Is installed, calibrated, operated, and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions, including routine maintenance and service checks for operability or running condition; and

3. Meets the performance requirements in 9VAC25-580-160 or 9VAC25-580-170, with any performance claims and their manner of determination described in writing by the equipment manufacturer or installer. In addition, methods used after December 22, 1990, except for methods permanently installed prior to that date, must be capable of detecting the leak rate or quantity specified for that method in subsections subdivisions 2, 3 and 4 of 9VAC25-580-160 or subdivisions 1 and 2 of 9VAC25-580-170 with a probability of detection of 0.95 and a probability of false alarm of 0.05.

B. When a release detection method operated in accordance with the performance standards in 9VAC25-580-160 or 9VAC25-580-170 indicates a release may have occurred, owners and operators must notify the board in accordance with Part V (9VAC25-580-190 et seq.) of this chapter.

C. Owners and operators of all UST systems must comply with the release detection requirements of this part by December 22 of the year listed in the following table:

SCHEDULE FOR PHASE-IN OF RELEASE DETECTION

Year system was installed

Year when release detection is required
(by December 22 of the year indicated)

1989

1990

1991

1992

1993

Before 1965 or date unknown

RD

P

 

 

 

1965-1969

 

P/RD

 

 

 

1970-1974

 

P

RD

 

 

1975-1979

 

P

 

RD

 

1980-1988

 

P

 

 

RD

New tanks (after December 22, 1988) immediately upon installation.

P = Must begin release detection for all pressurized piping in accordance with subdivision C 2 a of 9VAC25-580-140.

RD = Must begin release detection for tanks and suction piping in accordance with subsection subdivisions C 1 and subdivision C 2 b of 9VAC25-580-140, and 9VAC25-580-150.

D. Any existing UST system that cannot apply a method of release detection that complies with the requirements of this part must complete the closure procedures in Part VII (9VAC25-580-310 et seq.) of this chapter by the date on which release detection is required for that UST system under subsection C of this section.

9VAC25-580-140

9VAC25-580-140. Requirements for petroleum UST systems.

A. Owners and operators of petroleum UST systems required to have secondary containment under subdivision 7 of 9VAC25-580-50 must provide secondary containment and release detection for tanks and piping as follows:

1. Secondary containment systems must be designed, constructed, and installed to:

a. Contain regulated substances released from the tank system until they are detected and removed;

b. Prevent the release of regulated substances to the environment at any time during the operational life of the UST system; and

c. Be checked for evidence of a release at least every 30 days.

2. Double-walled tanks must be designed, constructed, and installed to:

a. Contain a release from any portion of the inner tank within the outer wall; and

b. Detect the failure of the inner wall.

3. External liners (including vaults) must be designed, constructed, and installed to:

a. Contain 100% of the capacity of the largest tank within its boundary;

b. Prevent the interference of precipitation or groundwater intrusion with the ability to contain or detect a release of regulated substances; and

c. Surround the tank completely (i.e., it is capable of preventing lateral as well as vertical migration of regulated substances).

4. Underground piping must be equipped with secondary containment that satisfies the requirements of subdivision 1 of this subsection (e.g., trench liners, jacketing of double-walled pipe). In addition, underground piping that conveys regulated substances under pressure must be equipped with an automatic line leak detector in accordance with subdivision 1 of 9VAC25-580-170.

5. Perform interstitial monitoring in accordance with subdivision 7 of 9VAC 25-580-160.

B. Owners and operators of petroleum USTs required to have secondary containment under subdivision 7 of 9VAC25-580-50 must have motor fuel underdispenser containment that is liquid-tight on its sides, bottom, and at any penetrations; be compatible with the substance conveyed by the piping; and allow for visual inspection and access to the components in the containment system or be monitored.

C. Owners and operators of petroleum UST systems not required to have secondary containment under subdivision 7 of 9VAC25-580-50 must provide release detection for tanks and piping as follows:

1. Tanks. Tanks must be monitored at least every 30 days for releases using one of the methods listed in subsections subdivisions 4 through 8 of 9VAC25-580-160 except that:

a. UST systems that meet the performance standards in subsections subdivisions 1 through 5 of 9VAC25-580-50 or subsections subdivisions 1 through 4 of 9VAC25-580-60 may use both monthly inventory control requirements in subsection subdivision 1 or 2 of 9VAC25-580-160, and tank tightness testing (conducted in accordance with subsection subdivision 3 of 9VAC25-580-160 at least every five years until December 22, 1998, or until 10 years after the tank is installed or upgraded under subsection subdivision 2 of 9VAC25-580-60, whichever is later;

b. UST systems that do not meet the performance standards in 9VAC25-580-50 or 9VAC25-580-60 may use monthly inventory controls (conducted in accordance with subsection subdivision 1 or 2 of 9VAC25-580-160) and annual tank tightness testing (conducted in accordance with subsection subdivision 3 of 9VAC25-580-160) until December 22, 1998, when the tank must be upgraded under 9VAC25-580-60 or permanently closed under 9VAC25-580-320; and

c. Tanks with capacity of 550 gallons or less may use weekly tank gauging (conducted in accordance with subsection subdivision 2 of 9VAC25-580-160).

2. Piping. Underground piping that routinely contains regulated substances must be monitored for releases in a manner that meets one of the following requirements:

a. Pressurized piping. Underground piping that conveys regulated substances under pressure must:

(1) Be equipped with an automatic line leak detector conducted in accordance with subdivision 1 of 9VAC25-580-170; and

(2) Have an annual line tightness test conducted in accordance with subdivision 2 of 9VAC25-580-170 or have monthly monitoring conducted in accordance with subdivision 3 of 9VAC25-580-170.

b. Suction piping. Underground piping that conveys regulated substances under suction must either have a line tightness test conducted at least every three years and in accordance with subdivision 2 of 9VAC25-580-170, or use a monthly monitoring method conducted in accordance with subdivision 3 of 9VAC25-580-170. No release detection is required for suction piping that is designed and constructed to meet the following standards:

(1) The below-grade piping operates at less than atmospheric pressure;

(2) The below-grade piping is sloped so that the contents of the pipe will drain back into the storage tank if the suction is released;

(3) Only one check valve is included in each suction line;

(4) The check valve is located directly below and as close as practical to the suction pump; and

(5) A method is provided that allows compliance with subdivisions 2 b (2) through (4) of this section subsection to be readily determined.

9VAC25-580-370

9VAC25-580-370. Requirements for delivery prohibition.

A. No person shall deliver to, deposit into, or accept a petroleum product or other regulated substance into an underground storage tank that has been identifiedunder subdivision G 2 of this section ] by the board to be ineligible for such delivery, deposit, or acceptance. Unless authorized in writing by the board, no person shall alter, deface, remove, or attempt to remove a tag that prohibits delivery, deposit, or acceptance of a petroleum product or other regulated substance to an underground storage tank.

B. When an inspection or other information provides reason to believe one or more of the following violations exists, the board shall initiate a proceeding in accordance with subsection D of this section:

1. Spill prevention equipment is not installed on the UST system properly as required by 9VAC25-580-50 or 9VAC25-580-60 or is disabled;

2. Overfill protection equipment is not installed on the UST system properly as required by 9VAC25-580-50 or 9VAC25-580-60 or is disabled;

3. Release detection equipment is not installed on the UST system properly or is disabled or a release detection method is not being performed as required by 9VAC25-580-50 or 9VAC25-580-60;

4. Corrosion protection equipment is not installed on the UST system properly as required by 9VAC25-580-50 or 9VAC25-580-60 or is disabled;

5. Secondary containment is not installed on the UST system properly as required by 9VAC25-580-50, 9VAC25-580-60, or 9VAC25-580-150 or is disabled; or

6. The board has reason to believe that an UST system is leaking and the owner or operator has failed to initiate and complete the investigation and confirmation requirements of 9VAC25-580-190 through 9VAC25-580-210.

C. For purposes of subsection B of this section, spill prevention, overfill prevention, corrosion protection, release detection, or secondary containment equipment that is not verifiable as installed is not installed.

D. The board shall provide written notice to the owner and operator pursuant to subdivision G 1 of this section that it will conduct an informal fact finding pursuant to § 2.2-4019 of the Code of Virginia to determine whether the underground storage tank(s) shall be ineligible for delivery, deposit, or acceptance of a petroleum product or other regulated substance. The fact finding shall be scheduled as soon as practicable after the notice, and within 10 business days in any event. Upon a finding to impose delivery prohibition, the board shall affix a tag to the fill pipe of the underground storage tank(s) prohibiting delivery, deposit, or acceptance of a petroleum product or other regulated substance.

E. When the board issues a notice of alleged violation based on an inspection or other information that provides reason to believe a UST system is not in compliance with the requirements of Part II, III, or IV of this chapter not listed in subsection B of this section, the requirements of 9VAC25-580-240 through 9VAC25-580-280, or the requirements of 9VAC25-590 (Petroleum Underground Storage Tank Financial Responsibility Requirements), and the owner or operator fails to comply with the notice of alleged violation within the time prescribed by the board, the board may proceed in accordance with subsection D of this section.

F. The board may classify all underground storage tanks containing petroleum or any other regulated substance at a facility as ineligible for delivery, deposit, or acceptance of a petroleum product or other regulated substance if one or more underground storage tanks at the facility has been classified as ineligible for more than 90 days and the ineligible underground storage tank(s) has neither been closed in accordance with 9VAC25-580-310 or 9VAC25-580-320 nor returned to compliance. The board shall provide written notice to the owner and operator pursuant to subdivision G 1 of this section that it will conduct an informal fact finding pursuant to § 2.2-4019 of the Code of Virginia to determine whether all the underground storage tanks shall be ineligible for delivery, deposit, or acceptance of a petroleum product or other regulated substance. The fact finding shall be scheduled as soon as practicable after the notice, and within 10 business days in any event.

G. Notice.

1. The board shall provide written notice of an informal fact finding to consider delivery prohibition to the owner and operator. The notice shall meet the requirements of § 2.2-4019 of the Code of Virginia. The notice shall further advise the owner and operator of the possibility of a special order pursuant to subsection I of this section.

2. The presence of the delivery prohibition tag on the fill pipe of an ineligible underground storage tank shall be sufficient notice to any person, including the owner, the operator, and product deliverers, that the underground storage tank is ineligible for delivery or deposit. The board may use other methods in addition to the delivery prohibition tag to provide notice to product deliverers.

H. An owner or operator shall notify the board in writing once an ineligible underground storage tank has been returned to compliance and provide a written report detailing all actions that have been taken to return the UST system to compliance, as well as supporting evidence such as test reports, invoices, receipts, inventory records, etc. As soon as practicable after confirming that the underground storage tank is in compliance with the requirements of this chapter or 9VAC25-590, or both, but in no event later than two business days, the board shall remove or authorize the owner or operator, in writing, to remove the delivery prohibition tag.

I. If the board determines that a violation exists that warrants the imposition of delivery prohibition, the board may further consider whether the threat posed by the violation is outweighed by the need for fuel from the underground storage tank(s) in question to meet an emergency situation or the need for availability of or access to motor fuel in any rural and remote area. If the board finds that such a condition outweighs the immediate risk of the violation, the board may defer imposition of delivery prohibition for up to 180 days. In every such case the director shall consider (i) issuing a special order under the authority of subdivision 10 of § 10.1-1186 of the Code of Virginia prescribing a prompt schedule for abating the violation and (ii) imposing a civil penalty.

J. The board may temporarily authorize an owner or operator to accept delivery into an ineligible underground storage tank(s) if such activity is necessary to test or calibrate the underground storage tank(s) or dispenser system.

K. Nothing in this section shall prevent the board or the director from exercising any other enforcement authority including, without limitation, their authority to issue emergency orders and their authority to seek injunctive relief.